Speak for Britain!: A New History of the Labour Party

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Random House, Mar 24, 2010 - Political Science - 480 pages

Written at a critical juncture in the history of the Labour Party, Speak for Britain! is a thought-provoking and highly original interpretation of the party's evolution, from its trade union origins to its status as a national governing party. It charts Labour's rise to power by re-examining the impact of the First World War, the general strike of 1926, Labour's breakthrough at the 1945 general election, the influence of post-war affluence and consumerism on the fortunes and character of the party, and its revival after the defeats of the Thatcher era.

Controversially, Pugh argues that Labour never entirely succeeded in becoming 'the party of the working class'; many of its influential recruits - from Oswald Mosley to Hugh Gaitskell to Tony Blair - were from middle and upper-class Conservative backgrounds and rather than converting the working class to socialism, Labour adapted itself to local and regional political cultures.

 

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User Review  - kazimiera - LibraryThing

a fairly intersting book about the labour party however i must admit i did dip in and out of the book in some parts Read full review

Contents

Lily livered Methodists
14
No bigger than a mans hand
37
Not a single Socialist speech
60
Come to your countrys aid
100
Dollar Princess
128
Aristocratic embrace
164
Further from Socialism
184
Reversal of Parts
217
We are the masters now
286
I2 A grand conception
319
I3 Forward march halted
353
Shes changed it all
387
Notes
415
Bibliography
437
Index
453
Copyright

Jo Speak for England
257

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About the author (2010)

Martin Pugh was Professor of British History at Newcastle University and Research Professor in History at Liverpool John Moores University. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society, a member of the advisory panel of the BBC History Magazine, and the author of over twelve books on nineteenth- and twentieth-century history. He lives in Northumberland.