The Indiana School Journal, Volume 6

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Indiana State Teachers' Association, 1861 - Education
 

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Page 264 - and if severe in aught. The love he bore to learning was in fault; The village all declared how much he knew, 'Twas certain he could write and cypher too; Lands he could measure, terms and tides presage, And even the story ran that he could guage; In arguing too. the parson owned his skill.
Page 186 - fence that skirts the way, With blossomed furze, unprofltably gay, There in his noisy mansion, skilled to rule, The village master taught his little school. A man severe he was, and stern to view, I knew him well, and every truant knew ; Well had the
Page 262 - his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have mistaken him for the genius of famine descending upon the earth, or some scarecrow eloped from a cornfield. "The school-house was a low building of one large room, rudely constructed of logs; the windows partly glazed, and partly patched with leaves of old copy-books.
Page 264 - The village all declared how much he knew, 'Twas certain he could write and cypher too; Lands he could measure, terms and tides presage, And even the story ran that he could guage; In arguing too. the parson owned his skill. For even though vanquished, he could argue still;
Page 262 - so that it looked like a weathercock perched upon his spindle neck to tell which way the wind blew. To see him striding along the profile of a hill on a windy day, his clothes bagging and fluttering about him, one might have
Page 187 - though vanquished, he could argue still; While words of learned length, and thundering sound, Amazed the gazing rustics, ranged around ; And still they gazed, and still the wonder grew, That one
Page 263 - Spare the rod and spoil the child." Ichabod Crane's scholars certainly were not spoiled. " I would not have it imagined, however, that he was one of those cruel potentates of the school who joy in the smart of their subjects; on the contrary, he administered justice with
Page 263 - said to be legitimately descended from the nose of Ichabod Crane. Thus, by divers little make-shifts, in that ingenious way which is commonly denominated "by hook and by crook," the worthy pedagogue got on tolerably enough, and was thought, by all who understood nothing of the labor of
Page 125 - as little as possible, and induced to discover as much as possible. Humanity has progressed solely by self-instruction ; and that to achieve the best results each mind must progress somewhat after the same fashion, is continually proved by the marked success of self-made men.—Herbert Spencer.
Page 187 - Lulled in the countless chambers of the brain. Our thoughts are linked by many a hidden chain ; Awake but one, and lo, what myriads rise! Each stamps its image as the other flies.

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