Journals: 1914-1927

Front Cover
University of Illinois Press, 2000 - Literary Collections - 496 pages
Presents the author's journals that testify a disciplined intelligence in a constantly maturing thought. This book offers details of his personal life and spiritual conflicts, accounts of his travels, and comments on the political and social events of the day, from the Dreyfus case to the German occupation.
 

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Contents

I
3
II
6
III
21
IV
98
V
116
VI
169
VII
187
VIII
191
XV
295
XVI
318
XVII
341
XVIII
346
XIX
367
XX
371
XXI
379
XXII
391

IX
222
X
236
XI
253
XII
255
XIII
261
XIV
282
XXIII
425
XXIV
429
XXV
459
XXVI
467
XXVII
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Gide, the reflective rebel against bourgeois morality and one of the most important and controversial figures in modern European literature, published his first book anonymously at the age of 18. Gide was born in Paris, the only child of a law professor and a strict Calvinist mother. As a young man, he was an ardent member of the symbolist group, but the style of his later work is more in the tradition of classicism. Much of his work is autobiographical, and the story of his youth and early adult years and the discovery of his own sexual tendencies is related in Si le grain ne meurt (If it die . . .) (1926). Corydon (1923) deals with the question of homosexuality openly. Gide's reflections on life and literature are contained in his Journals (1954), which span the years 1889--1949. He was a founder of the influential Nouvelle Revue Francaise, in which the works of many prominent modern European authors appeared, and he remained a director until 1941. He resigned when the journal passed into the hands of the collaborationists. Gide's sympathies with communism prompted him to travel to Russia, where he found the realities of Soviet life less attractive than he had imagined. His accounts of his disillusionment were published as Return from the U.S.S.R. (1937) and Afterthoughts from the U.S.S.R. (1938). Always preoccupied with freedom, a champion of the oppressed and a skeptic, he remained an incredibly youthful spirit. Gide himself classified his fiction into three categories: satirical tales with elements of farce like Les Caves du Vatican (Lafcadio's Adventures) (1914), which he termed soties; ironic stories narrated in the first person like The Immoralist (1902) and Strait Is the Gate (1909), which he called recits; and a more complex narrative related from a multifaceted point of view, which he called a roman (novel). The only example of the last category that he published was The Counterfeiters (1926). Throughout his career, Gide maintained an extensive correspondence with such noted figures as Valery, Claudel, Rilke, and others. In 1947, he received the Nobel Prize for Literature.

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