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be recommitted or amended until it has been twice read, nor shall any bill be amended after its third reading, except by the unanimous consent of the Senate.

38. Joint resolutions originating in the Senate shall lie on the table one day at least, unless otherwise ordered.

39. The yeas and nays on any question shall, at the desire of five senators, be entered on the Journal. After the yeas and nays shall have been taken, and before they are counted or entered on the Journal, the clerk shall read over the names of those who voted in the atfirmative and of those who voted in the negative, at which time any senator shall have the right to correct any mistake committed in enrolling his name:

40. Upon the determination of a question any senator may enter his protest upon the Journal, with the consent of one-third of the senators presentand on the question, “Shall the protest be entered on the Journal?'' no privileged motion shall be in order except to adjourn.

41. Whenever the Senate proceeds to consider any nominations of the governor which are subject to the choice or ratitication of the Senate, the same shall be considered in executive session, with closed doors, and the proceedings thereon shall be in secret, unless the injunction of secrecy be removed by a vote of the Senate.

42. A motion to take from the table shall not be in order unless the bill, resolution, or other matter proposed to be taken up would be appropriate for consideration under the order of business then in hand, as prescribed by rules 31 and 32.

VII.

ORDER AND DECORUM.

43. While the President is reporting or putting any question, or the clerk is reporting a bill or calling the roll, or a senator is addressing the chair, striet orler shall be observed.

H. If words be spoken in debate that give offence, exceptions thereto shall be taken the same day, and be stated in writing: and in such case, if the words be decided by the President or by the Senate, upon an appeal, to be offensive, and they be not explained or retracted by the senator who uttered them, he shall be subject to such action as the Senate may deem necessary.

VIII.

ASCERTAINING TUE QUESTION.

45. A motion for a second reading, and a motion for committing the bill, may be submitted at the same time: but the question upon these motions shall be put separately, if required by any senator.

46. Any senator may call for a division of the question, which shall be divided if it comprehend propositions so distinct in substance, that one being taken away, a substantive proposition shall remain for the decision of the Senate; and a motion to strike out being lost, shall preclude neither amendment nor a motion to insert, nor a motion to strike out and insert.

47. When a question is pending, no motion shall be received but to adjourn, to pass by for the pending question, for the previous question, to lie on the table, to postpone indefinitely, to adjourn the question to a different way to commit, or amend; which several motions shall have precedence in the order in which they are arranged.

IX.

TIE PENDING AND PREVIOUS QUESTIONS.

48. I'pon a motion for the pending question, seconded by a majority of the senators present, indicated by rising or by a recorded vote, the President shall imniediately put the pending question; and all incidental questions of order arising after a motion for the pending question is maile, ani pending such motion, shall be decided, whether on appeal or otherwise, without debate.

49. Upon a motion for the previous question, seconde by a majority of senators present, indicated by rising or by a recorded vote, the Presiilent shall immediately

JOURNAL OF THE SENATE.

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put the question, tirst upon amendments in the order prescribed in the rules, and then upon the main question. If the previous question be not ordered, debate may continue as if the motion had not been made.

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X.

TIKING THE VOTE.

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30. Every senator present, when any question is put or vote taken, shall vote or be counted as voting on one side or the other; but no senator shall vote on a question in the event of which he is immediately or personally interested.

51. Every question shall be first put in the attirmative, and then in the negative, and the President shall declare whether the yeas or nays have it; which declaration shall stand as the judgment of the Senate, unless å senator call for a division, in which event the President shall divide the Senate.

52. When the yeas and nays are ordered, or a call of the Senate is directed, the names of the senators shall be called in alphabetical order.

33. No Senator shall be allowed to vote unless he be present within the chamber at the time the Senate is being divided, or before a determination of the question upon a call of the roll.

XI.

DEBATE.

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54. When any member is about to speak in debate, or deliver any matter to the Senate, he shall arise from his seat, and without advancing, with due respect, address "Mr. PRESIDENT,"' confining himself strictly to the point in debate, and avoiding all disrespectful language.

3. No member shall speak more than twice on the same subject, without leave of the Senate; nor more than once, until every member choosing to speak shall have spoken.

56. No question shall be debated until it has been propounded by the President, and then the mover shall have a right to explain his views in preference to any senator.

57. When the President is putting a question, any senator who has not spoken before to the matter may speak to the question before the negative is put.

58. During any debate, any senator, though he has spoken to the matter, may rise and speak to the orders of the Senate, if they be transgressed, in case the President do not; but if the President stand up at any time, he is first to be heard, and while he is up senators must keep their seats.

39. No senator shall be allowed to be interrupted while speaking, except on points of order, to correct erroneous statements, or to answer any question that may be propounded by the senator speaking.

.). Votions to adjourn ; lay on the table; for the pending question ; for the previons question ; to suspend the rules; to take from the table; to take up orders of the day; to close debate; to limit debate; to extend limit of debate; to read papers; to reconsider questions not debatable, shall not be debated; but upon a motion to suspend a rule, or to take from the table, to lay on the table, or take up orders of the day, the mover shall be allowed five minutes to state the reasons for his motion, and one member opposed to the motion shall be allowed a like time to object. And when a question not debatable is before the Senate, all incidental questions arising after it is stated shall he decided and settled, whether on appeal or otherwise without debate; and the same rule shall apply to all incidental questions arising after any question is put to the house.

XII.

RECONSIDERATIOX.

61. A question being once determined must stand as the judgment of the Senate, and cannot during the same session be drawn again into debate. No motion tó reconsider a question which has been decided, shall be entertained, unless it be made by a senator voting with the prevailing side, nor unless made on the same

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day on which the vote was taken or within the two next days of actual session of the Senate thereafter: provided, however, that when any question is decided in the negative simply for the want of a majority of the whole Senate, any senator who was absent from the city of Richmond or detained from his seat by sickness at the time of the vote sought to be reconsidered, may move its reconsideration.

XIII.

PETITIONS.

62. No petitions of a private nature, having been once rejected, shall be acted on a second time, unless it be supported by new evidence; nor shall any such petition, after a third disallowance, be again acted on. The several clerks of committees shall keep alphabetical lists of all such petitions, specifying the session at which they were presented and the determination of the senate thereon and shall deliver the original petition to the clerk of the Senate, to be preserved in his office.

63. No petition shall be received claiming a sum of money or praying the settlement of unliquidated accounts, unless it be accompanied with the certificate of disallowance from the executive or auditor containing the reason why it was rejected. But this order shall extend to no person applying for a pension.

61. When any such petition, or bill founded on one, is rejected, such petition shall not be withdrawn; but the petitioner, or senator presenting his petition, or any senator from the county or corporation in which the petitioner resides, may, without leave, withdraw any document filed, therewith, and a list of all documents so withdrawn shall be preserved by the clerk. All petitions not finally acted on may, with the accompanying documents, be in like manner withdrawn after the expiration of the session at which they were presented.

65. No petition shall be read in the Senate unless particularly requested by some senator ; but every senator presenting one shall announce the name of the petitioner, nature of the application, and whether, in his opinion, a similar application had been before made by said petitioner. He shall also endorse on the back of the petition his own name as a pledge that it is drawn in respectful language; whereupon it shall be delivered to the clerk, hy whom it shall be laid before the proper committee.

XIV.

MANUAL AND RULES.

66. The rules of the Senate shall not be suspended except by a vote of twothirds of the senators present, to be ascertained by an actual division of the Senate.

XV.

CONSTRUCTION OF ROLES.

67. In the construction of the foregoing rules, reference shall first be had to Jefferson's Manual and the Digest of the rules of the ('ongress of the United States.

LI!

The PRESIDENT announced that the next business in order was the election of oflicers of the Senate; whereupon,

Mr. T. H. BARNES nominated as President pro tempore of the Senate, JOHN L. HURT.

There being no further nomination, the roll was then called with the following result:

For John L. Ilurt,

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Senators who voted for John L. IIUrt, are Messrs. Manly H. Barnes, Thomas H. Barnes, Berry, Buchanan, Echols, Fairfax, Flood, (ireen, Harnsberger, Harrison, Hay, Herbert, Jackson, Jennings, Jones, Jordan, LeCato, Little, Lovenstein,

JOURNAL OF THE SENATE.

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Maynard, Mellwaine, Miller, Morris, Mushbach, Parrish, Sands, Southall, St. ('lair, Stubbs, Tredway, Walton, Washington, Watts, Watson, Wells, Wickham, and Williams-37.

Mr. Hirt having received all the votes cast, was declared duly elected President pro tempore of the Senate.

The next business in order being the election of Clerk of the Senate,

Mr. LITTLE nominated for that office James Dudley Pendleton, of Orange county.

There being no further nomination, the roll was called with the following result:

For J. D. Pendleton,

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Senators who voted for J. D. PENDLETON, are-Messrs. Arthur, Manly H. Barnes, Thomas H. Barnés, Berry, Buchanan, Echols, Fairfax, Flood, Green, Harnsberger, Hay, Herbert, Hurt, Jackson, Jennings, Jones, Jordan, LeCato, Little, Lovenstein, Maynard, McIlwaine, Miller, Morris, Mushbach, Parrish, Sands, Southall, St. Clair, Stubbs, Tredway, Walton, Washington, Watts, Watson, Wells, Wickham, and Williams-38.

J. D. PENDLETON having received all of the votes cast, was declared duly elected clerk of the Senate for the ensuing term of the office.

The next business in order being the election of sergeant-at-arms of the Senate,

Mr. LOVENSTEIN nominated for that office Z. T. Weaver, of Giles county.

There being no further nomination, the roll was called with the following result:

For Z. T. Weaver,

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Senators who voted for Z. T. WEAVER, are-Messrs. Arthur, Manly H. Barnes, Thomas H. Barnes, Berry, Buchanan, Echols, Fairfax, Flool, Green, Harnsberger, Harrison, Hay, Herbert, Hurt, Jackson, Jennings, Jones, Jordan, LeCato, Little, Lovenstein, Maynard, McIlwaine, Miller, Morris, Mushbach, Parrish, Sands, Southall, St. Clair, Stubbs, Tredway, Walton, Washington, Watts, Watson, Wells, Wickham, and Williams-39.

Z. T. WEAVER having received all of the votes cast, was declared duly elected sergeant-at-arms of the Senate for the ensuing term of that office.

The Senate then proceeded to the election of doorkeeper.

Mr. LECato nominated for that office L. J. Gunter, of Accomac county.

There being no other nomination, the roll was called with the following result:

For L. J. Gunter,

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Senators who voted for L. J. GUNTER, are-Messrs. Arthur, Manly H. Barnes, Thomas H. Barnes, Berry, Buchanan, Echols, Fairfax, Flood, Green, Harnsberger, Harrison, Hay, Herbert, Hurt, Jackson, Jennings, Jones, Jordan, LeCato, Little, Lovenstein, Maynard, Mellwaine, Miller, Morris, Mushbach, Parrish, Sands, Sonthall, St. Clair, Stubbs, Tredway, Walton, Washington, Watts, Watson, Wells, Wickham, and Williams-39.

L. J. Gunter having received all the votes cast, was declared duly elected doorkeeper of the Senate for the ensuing term of that office.

Lieutenant-Governor TYLER then addressed the Senate.
On motion of Mr. ECHOLS,
Resolved, That the following be elected pages of the Senate:

Richard Miller, E. Guy Hopkins, Clarence A. Jeffries, and John Perat.

On motion of Mr. ECHOLS,

Ordered, That he inform the House of Delegates that the Senate is organized and ready to proceed to business.

A message was received from the House of Delegates by Mr. Nichol, who informed the Senate that that house was organized and ready to proceed to business.

A message was received from the IIouse of Delegates by Mr. GIBson, who informed the Senate that that Ilouse bad agreed to the following joint resolution:

Resolved (the Senate concurring), That a joint committee consisting of five on the part of the House and three on the part of the Senate be appointed to wait on the governor and inform him that the General Assembly is now organized and ready to receive any communication that he may desire to make.

The resolution was taken up and agreed to.
On motion of Mr. LOVENSTEIN, it was
Ordered, That he inform the House of Delegates thereof.

The PRESIDENT appointed Messrs. LOVENSTEIN, BUCHANAN and BERRY as the committee on the part of the Senate.

Subsequently, the committee through its chairman, Mr. LovenSTEIN, reported that they had performed the duty assigned them, and that the Governor would soon communicate in writing.

The following communication was received from the Governor; which on motion of Mr. STUBBS, was laid on the table and ordered to be printed, and two hundred and fifty extra copies ordered to be printed for the use of the Senate:

GOVERNOR'S OFFICE,

RICHMOND, V'A., December 6, 1893. To the General Assembly of Virginia:

The Constitution of the State requires the General Assembly to meet once in two years, unless in the opinion of the Governor, or two-thirds of the members of the legislature, the interests of the Commonwealth demand an extra session. I am glad to report that the condition of the Commonwealth has been such that, in my

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