Thomas Attwood: The Biography of a Radical

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McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP, Apr 1, 1990 - Biography & Autobiography - 400 pages
In addition to his political activities, Attwood laid claim to competence as an economist, based on his experience in banking and his observation of industrial practices in Birmingham. He focused most of his attention on the gold standard and its inhibitory effect on the growth of the economy. Long before the development of modern schools of economic theory, Attwood sought the regulation of business through control of the money supply. He was unsuccessful in his challenge to the Ricardian school, which promised stability through a gold based economy, and died disillusioned. Birmingham became identified with his brand of economic theory and a succession of economists followed his lead into the national arena. Through his study of Attwood's career and the development of his philosophy, David Moss reveals the impact of industrialism on the individual and society.
 

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Contents

Introduction
3
1 Family Background and Commercial Apprenticeship
17
2 Public Champion
35
3 Great Expectations
51
4 A Crime against the People
71
5 Backstairs Politics
85
6 False Hopes
100
7 New Directions
126
Vindication
183
10 A Stranger in the House
228
11 Failure
262
12 The Final Years
288
Notes
307
A Note on Sources
361
Index
367
Copyright

A Vehicle of Protest
152

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