The Private Journal of Aaron Burr, During His Residence of Four Years in Europe: With Selections from His Correspondence, Volume 1

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Harper & Brothers, 1838 - Europe
 

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Burr's notes and letters during his self exile in France Read full review

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Page 285 - Often, after reflecting on this subject, you appear to me so superior, so elevated above all other men ; I contemplate you with such a strange mixture of humility, admiration, reverence, love, and pride, that very little superstition would be necessary to make me worship you as a superior being : such enthusiasm does your character excite in me. When I afterward revert to myself, how insignificant do my best qualities appear. My vanity would be greater if I had not been placed so near you ; and yet...
Page 72 - This certainly was inevitable," replied the fond Theodosia ; " but I can not part with what has so long lain near my heart, and not feel some regret, some sorrow. No doubt there are many other roads to happiness, but this appeared so perfectly suitable to you, so complete a remuneration for all the past, it so entirely coincided with my wishes relative to you, that I cherished it as my comfort, even when illness scarcely allowed me any hope of witnessing its completion.
Page 203 - ... years' wandering in the old world, we cannot speak with any degree of particularity. He remained in England nearly a year, or until April, 1809 ; then, induced by the representations of the American Minister, Lord Liverpool addressed him a polite note, which stated that the presence of Colonel Burr in Great Britain was embarrassing to his majesty's government, and that it was the wish and expectation of the government that he should remove. Burr, who had been dined and...
Page 389 - I do verily believe that de Reizenstein is a sorceress! Indeed, I have no doubt of it and if I were President of the secret tribunal she should be burned alive to-morrow. Another interview, and I might have been lost, my hopes and projects blasted and abandoned.
Page 75 - O, my guardian angel, why were you obliged to abandon me just when enfeebled nature doubly required your care ! How often, when my tongue and hands trembled with disease, have I besought Heaven either to reunite us, or let me die at once. Yet do not hence imagine that I yield to infantine lamentations or impatience. As soon as relief from pain restored me in some measure to myself, I became more worthy the happiness of being your daughter.
Page 285 - I contemplate you with such a strange mixture of humility, admiration, reverence, love, and pride, that very little superstition would be necessary to make me worship you as a superior being ; such enthusiasm does your character excite in me. When I afterward revert to myself, how insignificant do my best qualities appear ! My vanity would be greater, if I had not been placed so near you ; and yet my pride is our Literary Notices. 513 relationship. I had rather not live than not be the daughter of...
Page 47 - I hasten to make you acquainted with Jeremy Bentham, author of a work entitled ' Principles of Morals and Legislation' (edited in French by Dumont), and of many other works of less labour and research. You will well recollect to have heard me place this man second to no one, ancient or modern, in profound thinking, in logical and analytic reasoning. On the 8th of August I received a letter from him, containing a most friendly invitation to come and pass some days with him at a farm (where he passes...
Page 58 - The world begins to cool terribly around me. You would be surprised how many I supposed attached to me have abandoned the sorry, losing game of disinterested friendship.
Page 126 - Of his entertainer on this occasion, he adds this remark: " Though he speaks of Bentham with reverence, and, probably, prays for him, I presume that he thinks he will be eternally damned, and I have no doubt he expects to be lolling in Abraham's bosom with great complacency, hearing Bentham sing out for a drop of water. Such is the mild genius of our holy religion.
Page 124 - No hack being to be had at that early hour, or, what is more probable, choosing to save the shilling, he had walked from his house to the inn, had fallen twice, got wet and bruised, and was very sure that he should be laid up with the gout for six months. I sympathized with his misfortunes. Wondered at the complacency with which he bore them, and joined him in cursing the weather, the streets, and the hackney coachmen. He became complacent and talkative. Such is John Bull.

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