the ladys magazine or entretaing companion for the fair sex

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Page 353 - Of stateliest view— and then recollect that the author of this sublime vision had never seen a glimpse of any thing like what he has imagined, that his favourite ancients had dropped not a hint of such divine scenery, and that the conceits in Italian gardens, and Theobalds and Nonsuch, were the brightest originals that his memory could furnish.
Page 440 - But this, says the philosopher, is not our business. All that we are concerned in is, to excel in the part which is given us. If it be an improper one, the fault is not in us, but in Him who has cast our several parts, and is the great disposer of the drama.
Page 211 - Our dying friends come o'er us like a cloud, To damp our brainless ardours, and abate That glare of life which often blinds the wise. Our dying friends are pioneers, to smooth Our rugged pass to death ; to break those bars Of terror and abhorrence Nature throws Cross our obstructed way, and thus to make Welcome, as safe, our port from every storm.
Page 459 - Many of the companies of player* were formerly so thin, that one person played two or three parts ; and a battle, on which the fate of an empire was supposed to depend, was decided by half a dozen combatants. It appears to have been a common practice in their mock engagements, to discharge small pieces of oldnance on the stage.
Page 331 - Yet, such as they are amongst us, they must be confessed to be the softest and sweetest, the most general and most innocent amusements of common time and life. They still find room in the Courts of Princes, and the cottages of shepherds. They serve to revive and animate the dead calm of poor or idle lives, and to allay or divert the violent passions and perturbations of the greatest and the busiest men.
Page 187 - Griping misers, nightly waking, See the end of all your care ; Fled on wings of our own making, We have left our owners bare.
Page 430 - Now you shall have three ladies walk to gather flowers, and then we must believe the stage to be a garden. By and by we hear news of shipwreck in the same place: then we are to blame if we accept it not for a rock.
Page 492 - WE all of us complain of the shortness of time, saith Seneca, and yet have much more than we know what to do with. Our lives, says he, are spent either in doing nothing at all, or in doing nothing to the purpose, or in doing nothing that we ought to do. We are always complaining our days are few, and acting as though there would be no end of them.
Page 519 - I'll teach thee what it is to love, And by what marks true passion may be found.
Page 207 - ... he is engaged at a cock-match ; or should he, through curiosity, make his appearance there, ever jovial and facetious, and equally free from the disturbance of passion and compassion, he will crack his joke from the bench with the vagrant whom he sentences to be whipped through the county, or with the felon whom he condemns to the gallows.

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