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" He who thinks that he can safely gauge the discrimination and taste of the lower animals may deny that the female Argus pheasant can appreciate such refined beauty; but he will then be compelled to admit that the extraordinary attitudes assumed by the... "
The Evolution of Woman: An Inquiry Into the Dogma of Her Inferiority to Man - Page 20
by Eliza Burt Gamble - 1894 - 356 pages
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 131

English literature - 1871
...that the female Argus pheasant can appreciate the refined beauty of the plumage of her mate, ' will be compelled to admit that the extraordinary attitudes...is a conclusion which I for one will never admit.' It seems then that it is this imaginary necessity of attributing purposclessness to acts, which determines...
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The Eclectic Magazine of Foreign Literature, Science, and Art, Volume 14

1871
...that the female Argus pheasant can appreciate the refined beauty of the plumage of her mate, " will be compelled to admit that the extraordinary attitudes...is a conclusion which I for one will never admit." It seems then that it is this imaginary necessity of attributing purposelessness to acts, which determines...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 111

1871
...plumage of her mate, " will be compelled to admit that the extraordinary attitudes assumed by th« male during the act of courtship, by which the wonderful...is a conclusion which I for one will never admit." It seems then that it is this imaginary necessity of attributing purposelessness to acts, which determines...
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The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, Volume 2

Charles Darwin - Evolution - 1871 - 475 pages
...human degree of taste, though perhaps she admires the general effect rather than each separate detail. He who thinks that he can safely gauge the discrimination...is a conclusion which I for one will never admit. Although so many pheasants and allied gallinaceous birds carefully display their beautiful plumage...
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The Descent of Man: And Selection in Relation to Sex, Volume 2

Charles Darwin - Evolution - 1871 - 491 pages
...He who thinks that he can safely gauge the discrimination and taste of the lower animals, may deiry that the female Argus pheasant can appreciate such...is a conclusion which I for one will never admit. Although so many pheasants and allied gallinaceous birds carefully display their beautiful plumage...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 131

English literature - 1871
...that the female Argus pheasant can appreciate the refined beauty of the plumage of her mate, ' will be compelled to admit that the extraordinary attitudes...is a conclusion which I for one will never admit.' It seems then that it is this imaginary necessity of attributing purposelessness to acts, which determines...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 131

English literature - 1871
...pheasant can appreciate the refined beauty of the plumage of her mate, ' will be compelled to admit tbat the extraordinary attitudes assumed by the male during...is a conclusion which I for one will never admit.' It seems then that it is this imaginary necessity of attributing purposelessness to acts, which determines...
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The London Quarterly Review, Volumes 130-131

1871
...can appreciate the refined beauty of the plumage of her mate, ' will be compelled to admit that he extraordinary attitudes assumed by the male during the act of courtship, by which ;he wonderful beauty of his plumage is fully displayed, are purposeless ; and this is a conclusion...
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The Descent of Man: And Selection in Relation to Sex

Charles Darwin - Evolution - 1874 - 705 pages
...almost human degree of taste. lie who thinks that ho can safely gauge the discrimination and taste 01 the lower animals may deny that the female Argus pheasant...is a conclusion which I for one will never admit. Although so many pheasants and allied gallinaceous birds carefully display their plumage before the...
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Lessons from Nature, as Manifested in Mind and Matter

St. George Jackson Mivart - Matter - 1876 - 462 pages
...that the female Argus pheasant can appreciate the refined beauty of the plumage of her mate, " will be compelled to admit that the extraordinary attitudes...is a conclusion which I for one will never admit." It seems then that it is this imaginary necessity of attributing purposelessness to acts which determines...
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