Types of English Drama, 1660-1780

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David Harrison Stevens
Ginn, 1923 - English drama - 920 pages
 

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Page 699 - So then, like an experienced general, you attack them on every quarter. If you find their reason manageable, you attack it with your philosophy ; if you find they have no reason, you attack them with this.
Page 822 - I assure you, Sir Peter, good nature becomes you. You look now as you did before we were married, when you used to walk with me under the elms, and tell me stories of what a gallant...
Page 702 - Perhaps so, madam. But I love to converse only with the more grave and sensible part of the sex. But I'm afraid I grow tiresome. Miss...
Page 187 - Oh woman ! lovely woman ! Nature made thee To temper man : we had been brutes without you ! Angels are painted fair to look like you : There's in you all, that we believe of" heaven ; Amazing brightness, purity and truth, Eternal joy, and everlasting love.
Page 424 - Coarse are his meals, the fortune of the chase, Amidst the running stream he slakes his thirst, Toils all the day, and at th' approach of night On the first friendly bank he throws him down, Or rests his head upon a rock till morn : Then rises fresh, pursues his wonted game, And if the following day he chance to find A new repast, or an untasted spring, Blesses his stars, and thinks it luxury.
Page 772 - Then let us study to preserve it so : and while Hope pictures to us a flattering scene of future bliss, let us deny its pencil those colours which are too bright to be lasting. — When hearts deserving happiness would unite their fortunes, Virtue would crown them with an unfading garland of modest hurtless flowers ; but ill-judging Passion will force the gaudier rose into the wreath, whose thorn offends them when its leaves are dropped ! [Exeunt omnes.
Page 690 - Ay, and bring back vanity and affectation to last them the whole year. I wonder why London cannot keep its own fools at home. In my time, the follies of the town crept slowly among us ; but now they travel faster than a stage-coach. Its fopperies come down, not only as inside passengers, but in the very basket.
Page 741 - I hope your prayers may be heard, with all my heart. Well then, Jack, I have been considering that I am so strong and hearty, I may continue to plague you a long time. Now, Jack, I am sensible that the income of your commission, and what I have hitherto allowed you, is but a small pittance for a lad of your spirit. Abs. Sir, you are very good. Sir Anth. And it is my wish, while yet I live, to have my boy make some figure in the world.
Page 182 - A sterile fortune, and a barren bed, Attend you both; continual discord make Your days and nights bitter and grievous: still May the hard hand of a vexatious need Oppress, and grind you; till at last you find The curse of disobedience all your portion.
Page 331 - No, I'll give you your revenge another time, when you are not so indifferent; you are thinking of something else now, and play too negligently: the coldness of a losing gamester lessens the pleasure of the winner. I'd no more play with a man that slighted his ill fortune than I'd make love to a woman who undervalued the loss of her reputation.

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