Wit and humour, poems, with an intr. [by J.C. Hotten].

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Page 112 - That there wasn'ta chance for one to start. For the wheels were just as strong as the thills, And the floor was just as strong as the sills, And the panels just as strong as the floor, And the whipple-tree neither less nor more, And the back-crossbar as strong as the fore, And spring and axle and hub encore.
Page 109 - THE DEACON'S MASTERPIECE: OR, THE WONDERFUL " ONE-HOSS SHAY." A LOGICAL STORY. TTAVE you heard of the wonderful one-hoss shay, That was built in such a logical way, It ran a hundred years to a day, And then, of a sudden, it — ah, but stay...
Page 110 - or an " I tell yeou ")— He would build one shay to beat the taown 'N' the keounty 'n' all the kentry raoun' ; It should be so built that it couldn' break daown :— " Fur," said the Deacon, " 't's mighty plain Thut the weakes' place mus' stan' the strain 'N' the way t' fix it, uz I maintain, Is only jest To make that place uz strong uz the rest.
Page 168 - And if I should live to be The last leaf upon the tree In the spring, Let them smile, as I do now, At the old forsaken bough Where I cling.
Page 126 - Man wants but little here below." Little I ask; my wants are few; I only wish a hut of stone (A very plain brown stone will do, That I may call my own — And close at hand is such a one, In yonder street that fronts the sun. Plain food is quite enough for me; Three courses are as good as ten; — If Nature can subsist on three, Thank Heaven for three. Amen!
Page 197 - Broad Grins,'' " My Nightgown and Slippers," and other Humorous Works, Prose and Poetical, of GEORGE COLMAN. With Life by GB BUCKSTONE, and Frontispiece by HOGARTH. Crown 8vo, cloth extra, gilt, 7s.
Page 149 - And there's a nice youngster of excellent pith, — Fate tried to conceal him by naming him Smith ; But he shouted -a song for the brave and the free, — Just read on his medal,
Page 127 - Give me a mortgage here and there,— Some good bank-stock, some note of hand, Or trifling railroad share,— I only ask that Fortune send A little more than I shall spend. Honors are silly toys, I know, And titles are but empty names; I would, perhaps, be Plenipo,— But only near St.
Page 167 - THE LAST LEAF I saw him once before, As he passed by the door, And again The pavement stones resound As he totters o'er the ground With his cane. They say that in his prime, Ere the pruning-knife of Time Cut him down, Not a better man was found 10 By the Crier on his round Through the town.
Page 98 - Miles Standish took the bowl, and filled it to the brim; The little Captain stood and stirred the posset with his sword, And all his sturdy men-at-arms were ranged about the board. He poured the fiery Hollands in, — the man that never feared, — He took a long and solemn draught, and wiped his yellow beard; And one by one the musketeers — the men that fought and prayed — All drank as 'twere their mother's milk, and not a man afraid.

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