Select British Classics, Volume 29

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J. Conrad, 1803 - English literature
 

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Page 170 - An expedient was therefore offered, that since words are only names for things, it would be more convenient for all men to carry about them such things as were necessary to express the particular business they are to discourse on.
Page 171 - I have often beheld two of those sages almost sinking under the weight of their packs, like pedlars among us ; who, when they met in the streets, would lay down their loads, open their sacks, and hold conversation for an hour together ; then put up their implements, help each other to resume their burthens, and take their leave.
Page 54 - ... with thick crust, extremely baked. His table cost him not much, though it was good to eat at. "His sports supplied all but beef and mutton; except...
Page 54 - ... hearth paved with brick lay some terriers and the choicest hounds and spaniels; seldom but two of the great chairs had litters of young cats in them which were not to be disturbed, he having always three or four attending him at dinner, and a little white round stick of fourteen inches long lying by his trencher that he might defend such meat as he had no mind to part with to them.
Page 76 - Wisdom crieth without ; she uttereth her voice in the streets : she crieth in the chief place of concourse, in the openings of the gates : in the city she uttereth her words...
Page 100 - twere vain to follow, For dog and horse he'd beat them hollow ; — Nay, if he put forth all his strength, Outstrip his brethren half a length. A tortoise heard his vain oration, And vented thus his indignation : " O puss ! it bodes thee dire disgrace When I defy thee to the race. Come, 'tis a match ; nay, no denial, I lay my shell upon the trial.
Page 54 - ... that had been used. On one side of this end of the room was the door of a closet, wherein stood the strong beer and the wine, which never came...
Page 25 - As to his body there can be no dispute; but examine even the acquirements of his mind, you will find them all contribute in their order towards furnishing out an exact dress : to instance no more ; is not religion a cloak, honesty a pair of shoes worn out in the dirt, selflove a surtout, vanity a shirt, and conscience a pair of breeches...
Page 53 - ... poles in great abundance. The parlour was a large room as properly furnished; on a great hearth paved with brick, lay some terriers, and the choicest hounds and spaniels. Seldom but two of the great chairs had litters of...
Page 117 - Arthur's out of their estates, and to take in all the knowing-ones on the turf at Newmarket. He accordingly bespoke his liveries, settled the fashion of his chariot, and had already pitched upon the lady, whose good luck it should be to fall in love with him: but so uncertain is the state of a gamester, that since the drawing of the lottery he has advertised for charitable contributions to a distressed gentleman, who knows the world, and has had the honour to be intimate with most of the nobility...

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