The Sense of Sound: Musical Meaning in France, 1260-1330

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, Apr 27, 2012 - Music - 400 pages
The Sense of Sound is a radical recontextualization of French song, 1260-1330. Situating musical sound against sonorities of the city, madness, charivari, and prayer, it argues that the effect of verbal confusion popular in music abounds with audible associations, and that there was meaning in what is often heard as nonsensical.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Prologue
3
1 Listening to the Past Listening in the Past
16
2 Sound and the City
51
3 Charivari
92
4 Madness and the Eloquence of Nonsense
129
5 Sound in Prayer
174
6 Sound in Prayer Books
186
The Hours of Jeanne dEvreux and Walters Art Museum W 102
243
8 Devotional Listening and the Montpellier Codex
287
Epilogue
329
Bibliography
333
Index
359
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Emma Dillon is Chair of Musicology, Kings College, London, and specialist of medieval music. She is author of Medieval Music-Making and the Roman de Fauvel (2002).

Bibliographic information