The history of England, Volume 5

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United Company of bookseller, 1775 - Great Britain
 

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Page 418 - I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
Page 362 - THE fame of this Princess, though it has surmounted the prejudices both of faction and bigotry, yet lies still exposed to another prejudice, which is more durable because more natural, and which...
Page 422 - Here die I, Richard Grenville, with a joyful and quiet mind, for that I have ended my life as a true soldier ought to do, that hath fought for his country, queen, religion, and honour...
Page 361 - ... of enemies, and the adulation of friends, than Queen Elizabeth ; and yet there is scarcely any whose reputation has been more certainly determined by the unanimous consent of posterity. The unusual length of her administration, and the strong features of her character, were able to overcome all prejudices; and obliging her detractors...
Page 362 - ... due to her, they make great addition to it. They owed all of them their advancement to her choice; they were supported by her constancy; and with all their abilities they were never able to acquire any undue ascendant over her.
Page 363 - ... some greater lenity of temper, some of those amiable weaknesses by which her sex is distinguished. But the true method of estimating her merit...
Page 418 - I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too, and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe, should dare to invade the borders of my realm; to which rather than any dishonour shall grow by me, I myself will take up arms, I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field.
Page 312 - ... hoped that her dutiful and loving subjects would not take away her prerogative, which is the chief flower in her garden and the principal and head pearl in her crown and diadem, but that they would rather leave these matters to her disposal.
Page 167 - sat on every face ; silence, as in the dead of night, reigned through all the chambers of the royal apartment ; the ladies and courtiers were ranged on each side...
Page 425 - While she was yet near at hand that I might hear of her once in two or three days, my sorrows were the less, but even now my heart is cast into the depth of all misery. I that was wont to behold her riding like Alexander, hunting like Diana, walking like Venus, the gentle wind blowing her fair hair about her pure cheeks like a nymph...

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