Waverley Novels, Volume 1

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Ticknor and Fields, 1864

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Page 106 - ... cradle at hame be the fairer spread up — not that I am wishing ill to little Harry, or to the babe that's yet to be born — God forbid — and make them kind to the poor, and better folk than their father. — And now, ride e'en your ways, for these are the last words ye'll ever hear Meg Merrilies speak, and this is the last reise that I'll ever cut in the bonny woods of Ellangowan.
Page 88 - With eyes severe and beard of formal cut, Full of wise saws and modern instances; And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts Into the lean and...
Page 79 - Twist ye, twine ye ! even so Mingle shades of joy and woe, Hope, and fear, and peace, and strife, 111 the thread of human life.
Page 207 - That weight of wood, with leathern coat o'erlaid ; Those ample clasps, of solid metal made; The...
Page 97 - ... bread, or some kind of provision to perhaps forty such villains in one day, are sure to be insulted by them,) but they rob many poor people who live in houses distant from any neighbourhood. In years of plenty many thousands of them meet together in the mountains, where they feast and riot for many days; and at country weddings, markets, burials, and other the like public occasions, they are to be seen, both men and women, perpetually drunk, cursing, blaspheming, and fighting together.
Page 70 - Tlie intelligible forms of ancient poets, The fair humanities of old religion, The power, the beauty, and the majesty, That had their haunts in dale, or piny mountain, Or forest by slow stream, or pebbly spring, Or chasms and watery depths; all these have vanished ; They live no longer in the faith of reason. But still the heart doth need a language, still Doth the old instinct bring back the old names...
Page 106 - Ye may stable your stirks in the shealings at Derncleugh — see that the hare does not couch on the hearthstane at Ellangowan. — Ride your ways, Godfrey Bertram — what do ye glower after our folk for ! — There's thirty hearts there that wad hae wanted bread ere ye had wanted sunkets, and spent their life-blood ere ye had scratched your finger. Yes — there's thirty yonder, from the auld wife of a hundred to the babe that was born last week, that ye have turned out o
Page 70 - For fable is Love's world, his home, his birthplace: Delightedly dwells he 'mong fays and talismans, And spirits; and delightedly believes Divinities, being himself divine.
Page 223 - I have six terriers at hame, forbye twa couple of slow-hunds, five grews, and a wheen other dogs. There's auld Pepper and auld Mustard, and young Pepper and young Mustard, and little Pepper and little Mustard ; I had them a' regularly entered, first wi...
Page 96 - There are at this day in Scotland (besides a great many poor families very meanly provided for by the church boxes, with others, who, by living on ba fond, fall into various diseases) two hundred thousand people begging from door to door. These are not only no way advantageous, but a very grievous burden to so poor a country. And though the number of them be perhaps double to what it was formerly, by reason of this present great distress, yet...

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