A reading book for evening schools, selected and ed. by C.K. Paul

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Charles Kegan Paul
1864
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Page 89 - Kendal green, when it was so dark thou couldst not see thy hand? come tell us your reason ; What sayest thou to this ? Poins. Come, your reason, Jack, your reason. Fal. What, upon compulsion? No; were I at the strappado, or all the racks in the world, I would not tell you on compulsion. Give you a reason on compulsion ! if reasons were as plenty as blackberries, I would give no man a reason upon compulsion, I. P.
Page 208 - May the great God, whom I worship, grant to my country, and for the benefit of Europe in general, a great and glorious victory, and may no misconduct in any one tarnish it; and may humanity after victory be the predominant feature in the British fleet! For myself individually, I commit my life to Him that made me; and may His blessing alight on my endeavours for serving my country faithfully!
Page 213 - Hardy ; and as that officer, though often sent for, could not leave the deck, Nelson feared that some fatal cause prevented him, and repeatedly cried, " Will no one bring Hardy to me ? he must be killed ! he is surely dead...
Page 39 - For why, said he, should you choose life, seeing it is attended with so much bitterness ? But they desired him to let them go.
Page 210 - Redoubtable, supposing that she had struck, because her great guns were silent ; for, as she carried no flag, there was no means of instantly ascertaining the fact. From this ship which he had thus twice spared, he received his death. A ball fired from her...
Page 39 - Then he falls upon them, and beats them fearfully, in such sort that they were not able to help themselves, or to turn them upon the floor. This done, he withdraws and leaves them there to condole...
Page 214 - Take care of my dear Lady Hamilton, Hardy; take care of poor Lady Hamilton. Kiss me, Hardy," said he. Hardy knelt down and kissed his cheek, and Nelson said, "Now I am satisfied. Thank God I have done my duty.
Page 20 - I had so much presence of mind as well as breath left, that, seeing myself nearer the main land than I expected, I got upon my feet, and endeavoured to make on towards the land as fast as I could, before another wave should return and take me up again. But I soon found it was impossible to avoid it ; for I saw the sea come after me as high as a great hill, and as furious as an enemy which I had no means or strength to contend with...
Page 38 - So when he was gone to bed, he told his wife what he had done, to wit, that he had taken a couple of prisoners, and cast them into his dungeon, for trespassing on his grounds. Then he asked her also, what he had best to do further to them. So she asked him what they were, whence they came, and whither they were bound ? and he told her. Then she counselled him, that when he arose in the morning he should beat them without any mercy.
Page 98 - God has sent it all; give thanks to Him.' When the poor woman had taken up all, she was so weak she could not carry it at once in, though the weight was not much neither ; so she left the biscuit, which was in a little bag, and left a little boy to watch it till she came again. 'Well, but/ says I to him, 'did you leave her the four shillings too, which you said was your week's pay?

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