Bibliomania; Or: Book-madness

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Chatto & Windus, 1876 - Bibliography - 618 pages
 

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Page 130 - Waken, lords and ladies gay, On the mountain dawns the day ; All the jolly chase is here, With hawk and horse and hunting-spear; Hounds are in their couples yelling. Hawks are whistling, horns are knelling, Merrily merrily mingle they: Waken, lords and ladies gay...
Page 293 - I took, early in the morning, a good dose of elixir, and hung three spiders about my neck ; and they drove my ague away. Deo gratias.
Page 373 - Henley stands, Tuning his voice, and balancing his hands. How fluent nonsense trickles from his tongue ! How sweet the periods, neither said, nor sung ! Still break the benches, Henley ! with thy strain, While Sherlock, Hare, and Gibson preach in vain.
Page 597 - The true Tragedie of Richard Duke of Yorke, and the death of good King Henrie the Sixt, with the whole contention betweene the two Houses Lancaster and Yorke, as it was sundrie times acted by the Right Honourable the Earle of Pembrooke his seruants.
Page 311 - This drew to the place a mighty trade ; the rather because the shops were spacious, and the learned gladly resorted to them, where they seldom failed to meet with agreeable conversation. And the booksellers themselves were knowing and conversible men, with whom, for the sake of bookish knowledge, the greatest wits were pleased to converse.
Page 602 - M. William Shake-speare, His True Chronicle History of the life and death of King Lear, and his three Daughters.
Page 8 - Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations : ask thy father, and he will show thee ; thy elders, and they will tell thee.
Page 431 - The Second part of Henrie the fourth, continuing to his death, and coronation of Henrie the fift. With the humours of Sir John Falstaffe, and swaggering Pistoll. As it hath been sundrie times publikely acted by the right honourable, the Lord Chamberlaine his seruants. Written by William Shakespeare.
Page 287 - ... worth when new five pounds. His house was perfectly of the old fashion, in the midst of a large park well stocked with deer...
Page 105 - Now, all amid the rigours of the year, In the wild depth of Winter, while without The ceaseless winds blow ice, be my retreat, Between the groaning forest and the shore Beat by the boundless multitude of waves, A rural, shelter'd, solitary scene; Where ruddy fire and beaming tapers join, To cheer the gloom. There studious let me sit, And hold high converse with the mighty dead...

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