The child's first Latin book

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Simpkin and Marshall, 1832 - Latin language - 99 pages
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Page 17 - ego unus Deus, et non est alius praeter me. Non usurpabitis nomen Dei vestri temere et sine causa. Sabbato nullum opus facietis. Colite patrem vestrum et matrem vestram : non occidetis: non adulterabitis : non facietis furtum: non dicetis
Page 17 - Sabbato nullum opus facietis. Colite patrem vestrum et matrem vestram : non occidetis: non adulterabitis : non facietis furtum: non dicetis
Page v - translations. As to the views of these eminent men, on minor points, though they were taken at different periods, and therefore might scarcely be expected to embrace the same objects,—nevertheless, they generally coincide, and may always be easily reconciled. But with regard to the efficacy of literal
Page vi - class, each may bestow just so much time as is necessary for a perfect understanding of the lesson. Besides, the book is always in good humour with its reader, and is never tired of answering
Page vi - must either be insufficient for one part of the class, or more than sufficient for another. There must be either a loss of learning or a loss of time. Whereas, when the English
Page vii - come with far more effect, when the lesson is in some degree familiar to all: and he will gain a vast deal of time for the communication of useful knowledge, by
Page iii - beating of the air." The great desideratum now seems to be the introduction and adoption of some system which may be the means of obviating that disgust so universally experienced by those who are compelled to the drudgery of learning languages as they are at present taught, and of
Page iv - schools, which would expose the " nakedness of the land," or interfere with their worldly ease; and thus a tyrannous bondage is entailed upon generation after generation, which is a disgrace and a curse to a civilized country. But we trust the time is fast approaching when the abominations of those "time-hallowed institutions
Page vi - but when Grammars and Dictionaries were introduced, the onus was thrown upon the shoulders of the pupil, and to this day he is compelled to learn, by his own solitary application, what his master is paid for teaching him. Oral instruction, on this plan, is absolutely necessary", but without literal
Page iii - THAT the present system of Classical Instruction is radically bad, no one, it is presumed, in this age of intelligence, will deny. The Grammar and Dictionary method of the old school has so long been denounced as " irrational in principle, and inefficient in operation,

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