The parliamentary gazetteer of England and Wales. 4 vols. [bound in 12 pt. with suppl.].

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1840
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Page 370 - Chenevix's library, furnished with three maps, one shelf, a bust of Sir Isaac Newton, and a lame telescope without any glasses. Lord John Sackville predecessed me here, and instituted certain games called cricketalia, which have been celebrated this very evening in honour of him in a neighbouring meadow.
Page 337 - Historical memoirs of the town and parish of Tiverton, in the county of Devon.
Page 333 - ... are those of grandeur and sublimity. But, as these emotions subside, and we descend from the contemplation of the whole to the examination of the parts, we are no less struck with the regularity of the plan, the lightness of the architecture, and the delicacy of the ornaments : we feel that elegance is its characteristic, no less than grandeur, and that the whole is a combination of the beautiful and the sublime.
Page 335 - There is service at the church, where a sermon is preached ; afterwards a procession takes place, and the wells are visited in succession : the psalms for the day, the epistle and gospel, are read> one at each well, and the whole concludes with a hymn, which is sung by the church singers, and accompanied by a band of music. This done, they separate, and the remainder of the day is spent in rural sports and holiday pastimes.
Page 370 - You perceive by my date that I am got into a new camp, and have left my tub at Windsor. It is a little play-thinghouse that I got out of Mrs. Chenevix's shop, and is the prettiest bauble you ever saw. It is set in enamelled meadows, with filigree hedges : A small Euphrates through the piece is roll'd, And little finches wave their wings in gold.
Page 335 - Court to dispossess her of this spirit; but all would not do, till Lamb, then Dean of the Arches, shot her through and through, with an arrow borrowed from her own quiver...
Page 364 - ... as one pleases : here is, likewise, deep play, and no want of amorous intrigues. As soon as the evening comes, every one quits his little palace to assemble on the bowlinggreen, where, in the open air, those who choose dance upon a turf more soft and smooth than the finest carpet in the world.
Page 390 - We were now arrived at Spring-garden, which is exquisitely pleasant at this time of the year. When I considered the fragrancy of the walks and bowers, with the choirs of birds, that sung upon the trees, and the loose tribe of people that walked under their shades, I could not but look upon the place as a kind of Mahometan "Paradise.
Page 231 - Shakspeare, that, take him for all in all, we shall not look upon his like again.
Page 250 - It is tile general opinion, that less rain falls in most parts of Surrey, than in the metropolis, or in the vale of London, so that the climate may, upon the whole, be regarded as dry, as far as respects the quantity of rain merely : but the southern border must necessarily be moist and damp, from the nature of the soil, the flatness of the surface, and the immense number of trees which cover it and obstruct ventilation. From the like causes, the low parts near the Thames must be considered as rather...

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