An American witness to India's partition

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Sage Publications, 2007 - History - 440 pages
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In 1938 the New York-based Institute of Current World Affairs awarded 23-year-old Phillips Talbot a fellowship with a mandate: visit South Asia and learn about the intricacies of life in India. Till 1950, Talbot graphically recounted the buildup to Indian and Pakistani independence, and the early experiences of the new states in the form of several letters to the institute.

Talbot`s reports from the field, presented here in the original, offer a kaleidoscope of first-hand observations: on student life at the Aligarh Muslim University, local life in a small Muslim community in Kashmir, a Vedic ashram in Lahore, Tagore`s Shantiniketan, Gandhi’s Sevagram, crucial sessions of the Indian National Congress and the All India Muslim League, the Kodaikanal Ashram Fellowship, Hindu and Muslim urban communities in Lahore and Bombay, Afghanistan, a walk with Gandhi in Noakhali, the parties` negotiations with Mountbatten that led to independence and more.

Written with flair and insight, An American Witness to India`s Partition, provides a perceptive view of South Asian society in its decisive decade.

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Contents

List of Illustrations
9
Preface
17
INDIA IN LONDON
23
Copyright

27 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

B. R. Nanda was formerly Director of the Nehru Museum and Library, New Delhi. He has written a number of well-known books on Gandhi and Nehru, the latest being Jawaheral Nehru: Rebel and Statesman (OUP, 1995).

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