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mith, which was perpetuated in the family down to my uncle's timo, the eldest son having been unitorly brought up to this employment: a custom which both he and iy father observed with respect to their ddest sóns.

In the researches I made at Eaton, I found no ac. count of their birtlis, marriages, and deaths, earlier than the year 1555; the parish register not extending farther back than that period. This register informed me, that I was the youngest son of the youngest branch mi und family, counting five generations. My grandfather, Thomas, was born in 1598, lived at Eaton till he was too old to continue his trade, when he retired so Banbury, in Oxfordshire, where his son John, who was a dier, resided, and with whom my father was apprer.ticer. He dieu, and was buried there: we saw his n.onument in 1758. His eldest son lived in the family house at Eaton, which he bequeathed, with the land belonging to it, to his only daughter, who, in concert with her husband, Mr. Fisher, of Welling borough, afterwar's sold it to Mr. Estead, the fireseni proprietor.

My gçandfather had four surviving sons, Thonnas, John, Benjamin, and Josias. I shall give you such particulars of them as my memory will furnish, not Having my papers here, in which you will find a niore minule account, if they are not lost during my ab. sence,

Thomas had learned the trade of a blacksnin under his father; but, possessing a good natual understanding. he improved it hy study, at the solicitation of a yenileman of the name of Palmer, who was at that tiine the principal inhabitant of the village, and who encouraged, in like manner, all my uncles to cultivate their minds. Thomas thus rendered himsell conipetent to the functions of a country attomey; suon became an essentiei personage in the affairs of the village; and was one of the chief movers of every public entersrise, as well relative to the county as the town of Northampton. A variety of remarkable in. cidents were told us of him at Eaton. After enjoy icg the esteem and patronage of Lord Halifax, he died Jandary 6, 1702, precisely four years before I was

may happen to me, as to so many others. My futine fortune is unknown but to Him in whose haud is our destinv, and who can make her very afflictions subservierit to our benefit.

Ore of my oncles, desirous, like myself, of collect. ing anecdutes of our family, gave ne soine notes, from which I have derived many particulars respect. ing our ancestors. From these I learn, that they had lived in the sanre village (Eaton, in Northampton shire,) upon a freehold vi about thirty acres, for the

space at least of three hundred years. How long: they had resided there, prior to that period, my whicla had been unable to discover; probably ever sinco the institutior: of sumames, when they took the appellation of Franklin, which had forinerly been the nama of a particular order of individuals. *

This petty estate would not have sufficed, for their subsistence, had they not added the trade of black.

* As a proof that Franklin was anciently the common, oame of AD order or rank in England, see Judge Fortesque,

De laudibus legum Anglia, written about the year. 1412, in, which is the following passage, to show that good juries. might easily be formed in any part of king and .

«Regio etiam illa, ita respersa referiaque est possessoribus terrarum et agrorum, quod in ea villula tam parva reperiri spon poterit, in qua con est miles, armiger, veljaler-familiasa qualis ibidem franklin vulgaritur nuncupatur, magnis diatus possessiunibus, nec non libere tenentes et alii valecti plurimi, suis patrimoniis suficientes, ad faciendum jurulam, in forma præputata."

• Moreover, the same country is so filled and replenished with landed menne, that there in so small a thorre cannot be found wherein dwelletb not knight, an esquire, or such a house holder as is there commonly called a franklin, en riched with great possessions, and also other creeholders and many yeomen, able for their livelihnud to take a jury in form. aforementioned.'

Old Translation. Chaucer ton calls his country-gentleman a franklin; and, after describing his good housekeeping, thus characterizes bum:

This worthy franklin bore a purse of silk
Fir'd to his girdle, white as morning milk;
Knight of the shire. first justice th' assizo,
To help the poor, the doubtful to advise.
In all employments, generous, just, he provide
Recowo'd for courtesy, by al belor'd

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mith, which was perpetuated in the family down to my uncle's time, the ellest son having been unitorm. by brought up to this employment: a custom which both he and iny father observed with respect to their ddest sons.

In the researches I made at Eaton, I found no ac. count of their birtlis, marriages, and deaths, earlier than the year 1555; the parish register not extending farther back than that period. This register informed me, that I was the youngest son of the youngest branch mi ing family, counting five generations. My grandfather, Thomas, as born in 1598, lived at Eaton till he was too old to continue his trade, when he retired 20 Bashury, in Oxfordshire, where his son John, who was a dier, resided, and with whom my father was apprer.tice... He dieu, and was buried there: we saw his n.oriument in 1758. His eldest son lived in the family house at Eaton, which he bequeathed, with the la..d belonging to it, to his only daughter, who, in concert with her husband, Mr. Fisher, of Welling. borough, afterwar's sold it to Mr. Estead, the foresent proprietor.

My grandfather had four surviving sons, Thornas, John, Benjamin, and Josias. I shall give you such particulars of tirem as my memory will furnish, not having my papers here, in which you will find a nore minute account, if they are not lost during my ab. sence,

Thomas had learned the trade of a blacksniu under his father; but, possessing a good natwal un. derstanding he improved it by study, at the solicitation of a gentleman of the name of Palmer, who was at that tiine the principal inhabitantuf the village, and who encouraged, in like manner, all my uncles to cultivate their minds. Thomas thus rendered himself contpetent to the functions of a country attomey; suon became an essentia: personage in the affairs of the village; and was one of the chief movers of every public enter,rise, as well relative to the county as the low'n of Northampton. A variety of remarkable in. cidents were told us of him at Eaton. After enjoyicg the esteem and patronage of Lorá Halifax, he died January 6, 1702, precisely four years before I was

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born. The recital that was made us of his life and character, by soine aged persons of the ville je, struck you, I remember, as extraordinary, from its analogy to what you knew of myself. “ Had he died," said you, “ just four years later, one might have supposent i transmigration of souls."

John, to the best of my belief, was brought up to the trade of a woni-dier.

Benjamin served his apprenticeship in London to • silk-dier. He was an industrivus man: I reniem ber him well; for, while I was a child, he joined my father at Boston, and lived for soine years in the house with us. A particular affection had always subsisted fretween my father and hinı; and I was his god-son. He arrived to a great age. He left behind him two quarto volumes of poems in manuscript, consistirg of Little fugitive pieces addressed in his friends. He had invented a short-hand, which he taught me, but, hav. ing never made use of it, I have now forgotten it He was a man of piety, and a constant attendant on the best preachers, whose serinons he took a pleasure in writing down according to the expeditory method he had devised. Many volumes were thus collected by him. He was also extremely fond of politics; too much so, perhaps, for his situation. I lately found in London a collection which he had made of all tho principal pamphlets relative to public affairs, from the year 1641 to 1717. Many volumes are wanting, as appears by the series of numbers; but there still remain eight ir. folio, and twenty-four in quarto and actavo. The collection had fallen into the hands of a second-hand bukseller, who, knowing ine by hav. ing solo me some Dvoks, brought it to me. My uncle, it seems, had left it whind on his departure fur Amerita, about fifty years ago. I found various notes of his writing in the margins. His grandson, Samuel, 's aow living at Boston.

Our humble family had early embraced the Refor. nation. They remained faithfully attached during the reign of Queen Mary, when they were in danger of being molested! on account of their zeal against popery. They had an English Bible, and, to conceal it the more securely, they couceived the project of

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