The voyages and expeditions of captains Ross, Parry, & Franklin in search of a north west passage

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Dean & Munday, 1834 - Arctic regions - 36 pages
 

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Page 34 - ... degrees below zero, immediately took the consistency of ice, and thus we actually became the inhabitants of an iceberg during one of the most severe winters hitherto recorded ; our sufferings, aggravated by want of bedding, clothing, and animal food, need not be dwelt upon. Mr. C. Thomas, the carpenter, was the only man who perished at this beach, but three others, besides one who had lost his foot, were reduced to the last stage of debility, and only 13 of our number were able to carry provisions...
Page 35 - Next day, when the gale abated, we crossed Admiralty Inlet, and were detained six days on the coast by a strong north-east wind. On the 25th we crossed Navy Board Inlet, and on the following morning, to our inexpressible joy, we descried a ship in the offing, becalmed, which proved to be the Isabella of Hull, the same ship which I commanded in 1818: at noon we reached her, when her enterprising commander, who had in vain searched for us in Prince Regent's Inlet, after giving us three cheers, received...
Page 32 - This summer, like that of 1818, was beautifully fine, but extremely unfavourable for navigation; and our object being now to try a more northern latitude, we waited with anxiety for the disruption of the ice, but in vain, and our utmost endeavours did not succeed in retracing our steps more than five miles; and it was not until the middle of November that we succeeded in cutting the vessel into a place of security, which we named
Page 32 - America, that about forty miles to the SW there were two great seas, one to the west, which was divided from that to the east by a narrow strait or neck of land. The verification of this intelligence either way, on which our future operations so materially depended, devolved on Commander Ross, who volunteered...
Page 13 - midst the shades of night, Her native energies again resume, Dispel the dreary winter of the tomb, And, bidding Death with all its terrors fly, Bloom in perpetual Spring thro' all eternity ! NORTH GEORGIA GAZETTE, AND WINTER CHRONICLE.
Page 17 - November, he was invested with the conduct of an expedition destined to proceed overland from the shores of Hudson's Bay, for the purpose more particularly of ascertaining the actual position of the mouth of the Coppermine River, and the exact trending of the shores of the Polar Sea, to the eastward of that river.
Page 8 - R. was about to call for assistance from the surgeon. They were however soon undeceived, as he immediately proceeded to execute, in succession, a variety of extraordinary gestures and attitudes, accompanied by the most hideous distortions of countenance. Like the similar amusements of very different climates, these contained the indecent allusions •which are well known to form an essential feature in the dances of many nations, in other respects far advanced in civilization. The body was generally...
Page 32 - During the same journey he also surveyed 30 miles of the adjacent coast, or that to the north of the isthmus, which, by also taking a westerly direction, formed the termination of the western sea into a gulf. The rest of this season was employed in tracing the sea coast south of the isthmus leading to the eastward, which was done...
Page 34 - July, carrying with us three sick men, who were unable to walk, and in six days we reached the boats, where the sick daily recovered. Although the spring was mild, it was not until the 15th of August that we had any cheering prospect. A gale from the westward having suddenly opened a lane of water along shore, in two days we reached our former position, and, from the mountain, we had the satisfaction of seeing clear water almost directly across Prince Regent's Inlet, which we crossed on the 17th,...
Page 7 - He met with a tribe of Esquimaux, with whom Saccheuse opened an intercourse, after considerable caution on their part. They first pointed to the ships, eagerly asking, what great creatures were they; and they wanted to know whether they came from the sun or the moon. Saccheuse told them that he was a man, that he had a father and mother like themselves ; and pointing to the South, said that he came from a distant country in that direction. To this they answered, "That cannot be, there is nothing...

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