The Waverley Novels: With the Author's Last Corrections and Additions, Volume 4

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Carey & Hart, 1846
 

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Page 53 - It is no longer mine," said Walter; "when Your Majesty's foot touched it, it became a fit mantle for a prince, but far too rich a one for its former owner.
Page 53 - The Queen paused, and then said hastily, "You are very young, to have fought so well, and to speak so well.
Page 52 - Elizabeth's eye — an eye never indifferent to the admiration which she deservedly excited among her subjects, or to the fair proportions of external form which chanced to distinguish any of her courtiers. Accordingly, she fixed her keen glance...
Page 51 - It was even so. The royal barge, manned with the queen's watermen, richly attired in the regal liveries, and having the banner of England displayed, did, indeed, lie at the great stairs which ascended from the river, and along with it two or three other boats for transporting such part of her retinue as were not in immediate attendance on the royal person.
Page 52 - At this moment the gates opened, and ushers began to issue forth in array, preceded and flanked by the band of gentlemen pensioners. After this, amid a crowd of lords and ladies, yet so disposed around her that she could see and be seen on all sides, came Elizabeth herself, then in the prime of womanhood, and in the full glow of what in a sovereign was called beauty, and who would in the lowest rank of life have been truly judged a noble figure, joined to a striking and commanding physiognomy.
Page 89 - ... this spacious enclosure, was composed of a huge pile of magnificent castellated buildings, apparently of different ages, surrounding an inner court, and bearing in the names attached to each portion of the magnificent mass, and in the armorial bearings which were there blazoned, the emblems of mighty chiefs who had long passed away, and whose history, could Ambition have lent ear to it, might have read a lesson to the haughty favourite, who had now acquired and was augmenting the fair domain.
Page 52 - Their discourse was here interrupted by one of the Band of Pensioners. " I was sent," said he, after looking at them attentively, " to a gentleman who hath no cloak, or a muddy one. You, sir, I think," addressing the younger cavalier, " are the man ; you will please to follow me.
Page 51 - ... the royal person. The yeomen of the guard, the tallest and most handsome men whom England could produce, guarded with their halberds the passage from the palace-gate to the river side, and all seemed in readiness for the Queen's coming forth, although the day was yet so early. "By my faith, this bodes us no good," said Blount; "it must be some perilous cause puts her Grace in motion thus untimeously.

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