Crime in Its Relations to Social Progress, Issue 40

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 1902 - Crime - 427 pages
Explores the evolution of crime and punishment in the Nineteenth century to primitive cultures and early European society. Specifically addresses the definition of crime and social punishment in different cultures and in the animal kingdom, as well as the effectiveness of legislation and social punishment.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents


Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page v - There shall never be one lost good! What was, shall live as before; The evil is null, is naught, is silence implying sound; What was good shall be good, with, for evil, so much good more; On the earth the broken arcs; in the heaven a perfect round.
Page 36 - But if the ox were wont to push with his horn in time past, and it hath been testified to his owner, and he hath not kept him in, but that he hath killed a man or a woman ; the ox shall be stoned, and his owner also shall be put to death.
Page 138 - I, then, Alfred, king, gathered these together, and commanded many of those to be written which our forefathers held, those which to me seemed good ; and many of those which seemed to me not good I rejected them, by the counsel of my
Page 12 - The very considerations which judges most rarely mention, and always with an apology, are the secret root from which the law draws all the juices of life. I mean of course, considerations of what is expedient for the community concerned.
Page 14 - The distinction of public wrongs from private, of crimes and misdemeanors from civil injuries, seems principally to consist in this: that private wrongs or civil injuries are an infringement or privation of the civil rights which belong to individuals, considered merely as individuals...
Page 330 - Get but the truth once uttered, and 'tis like A star new-born, that drops into its place, And which, once circling in its placid round, Not all the tumult of the earth can shake.
Page 151 - The bishops and learned men cursed them continually, but the effect thereof was nothing to them; for they were all accursed, and forsworn, and abandoned. To till the ground was to plough the sea: the earth bare no corn, for the land was all laid waste by such deeds; and...
Page 395 - He who would win the name of truly great Must understand his own age and the next, And make the present ready to fulfil Its prophecy, and with the future merge Gently and peacefully, as wave with wave.

Bibliographic information