Beulah: A Novel

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G.W. Dillingham, 1898 - 492 pages
 

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Page 245 - Such songs have power to quiet The restless pulse of care, And come like the benediction That follows after prayer. Then read from the treasured volume The poem of thy choice, And lend to the rhyme of the poet The beauty of thy voice. And the night shall be filled with music, And the cares, that infest the day, Shall fold their tents, like the Arabs, And as silently steal away.
Page 410 - And what is friendship but a name, A charm that lulls to sleep ; A shade that follows wealth or fame, And leaves the wretch to weep...
Page 197 - The moving Moon went up the sky, And nowhere did abide; Softly she was going up, And a star or two beside...
Page 381 - Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, for they rest from their labors, and their works do follow them!
Page 17 - Tell me not, in mournful numbers, Life is but an empty dream! — For the soul is dead that slumbers, And things are not what they seem. Life is real! Life is earnest! And the grave is not its goal; Dust thou art, to dust returnest, Was not spoken of the soul.
Page 272 - But lest I should mislead any when I have my own head and obey my whims, let me remind the reader that I am only an experimenter. Do not set the least value on what I do, or the least discredit on what I do not, as if I pretended to settle any thing as true or false.
Page 282 - This world is full of beauty, as other worlds above; And if we did our duty, it might be full of love.
Page 367 - I slept, and dreamed that life was beauty ; I woke, and found that life was duty. Was thy dream then a shadowy lie ? Toil on, sad heart, courageously, And thou shalt find thy dream to be A noonday light and truth to thee.
Page 300 - And I gave my heart to know wisdom, and to know madness and folly: I perceived that this also is vexation of spirit. For in much wisdom is much grief: and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.
Page 126 - I have no churlish objection to the circumnavigation of the globe, for the purposes of art, of study, and benevolence, so that the man is first domesticated, or does not go abroad with the hope of finding somewhat greater than he knows. He who travels to be amused, or to get somewhat which he does not carry, travels away from himself, and grows old even in youth among old things. In Thebes, in Palmyra, his will and mind have become old and dilapidated as they. He carries ruins to ruins.

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