A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary: And Expositor of the English Language...

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Page 64 - As emphasis evidently points out the most significant word in a sentence ; so, where other reasons do not forbid, the accent always dwells with greatest force on that part of the word which, from its importance, the hearer has always the greatest occasion to observe : and this is necessarily the root or body of the word.
Page 73 - The secondary accent is that stress which we may occasionally place upon another syllable, besides that which has the principal accent ; in order to pronounce every part of the word more distinctly, forcibly, and harmoniously : thus, "Complaisant, caravan," and " violin," have frequently an accent on the first as well as on the last syllable, though a somewhat less forcible one. The same may be observed of "Repartee, referee, privateer, domineer,
Page 34 - When vowels are under the accent, the prince, and the lowest of the people in the metropolis, with very few exceptions, pronounce them in the same manner ; but the unaccented vowels in the mouth of the former have a distinct, open, and specific sound, while the latter often totally sink them, or change them into some other sound.
Page 6 - Grœcism of the schools, will be denominated respectable usage, till a certain number of the general mass of speakers have acknowledged them ; nor will a multitude of common speakers authorize any pronunciation which is reprobated by the learned and polite.
Page 56 - The rough r is formed by jarring the tip of the tongue against the roof of the mouth near the fore teeth: the smooth r is a vibration of the lower part of the tongue, near the root, against the inward region of the palate, near the entrance of the throat. This latter r is that which marks the pronunciation of England, and the former that of Ireland.
Page 4 - Most of the writers of English Grammars have given long tables of words pronounced otherwise than they are written, and seem not sufficiently to have considered that of English, as of all living tongues, there is a double pronunciation, one cursory and colloquial, the other regular and solemn.
Page 4 - For pronunciation the best general rule is, to consider those as the most elegant speakers who deviate least from the written words.
Page 26 - ... not unfrequently hear it now pronounced with the broad English i, in those circles where, a few years ago, it would have been an infallible mark of vulgarity.
Page 329 - Sleeping within mine orchard, My custom always of the afternoon, Upon my secure hour thy uncle stole, With juice of cursed hebenon in a vial, And in the porches of mine ears did pour The leperous distilment...
Page 1 - A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, and Expositor of the English Language: in which, Not only the Meaning of every Word is clearly explained, and the Sound of every Syllable distinctly shown, but, where Words are subject to different Pronunciations, the Authorities of our best Pronouncing Dictionaries are fully exhibited, the reasons for each are at large displayed, and the preferable Pronunciation is pointed out.

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