Technology Quarterly and Proceedings of the Society of Arts, Volume 6

Front Cover
The Institute, 1893 - Industrial arts
Vol. 8-14 include "Review of American chemical research" edited by Arthur A. Noyes.
 

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Page 74 - And king Solomon sent and fetched Hiram out of Tyre. He was a widow's son of tb,e tribe of Naphtali, and his father was a man of Tyre, a worker in brass: and he was filled with wisdom, and understanding, and cunning to work all works in brass. And he came to king Solomon, and wrought all his work.
Page 168 - ... just as there is no royal road to learning, so there is no means by which formulae can be substituted for a knowledge of principles.
Page 367 - Society are to awaken and maintain an active interest in the practical sciences, and to aid generally in their advancement and development in connection with arts, agriculture, manufactures, and commerce.
Page 59 - The notion that scientific work was something essentially less fine and high and noble than the pursuit of rhetoric and philosophy, Latin and Greek, was deeply seated in the minds of the leading educators of America a generation ago. And it has not even yet wholly yielded to the demonstration offered by the admirable effects of the new education in training up young men to be as modest and earnest, as sincere, manly and pure, as broad and appreciative, as were the best products of the classical culture,...
Page 60 - ... philosophy, Latin and Greek, was deeply seated in the minds of the leading educators of America a generation ago. And it has not even yet wholly yielded to the demonstration offered by the admirable effects of the new education in training up young men to be as modest and earnest, as sincere, manly and pure, as broad and appreciative, as were the best products of the classical culture, and, withal, more exact and resolute and strong. We can hardly hope to see that inveterate prepossession altogether...
Page 104 - The varying exposures of the rooms or a school or other building similarly occupied, require that more heat shall be supplied to some than to others. The sunlit, southerly room, perhaps still more favored by being over the boiler, may be kept perfectly comfortable with a supply of heat that perchance will barely maintain a temperature of 50 to 60 F. in a room on the opposite side of the building, exposed to high winds and shut off from the warmth of the sunshine. With a constant and equal volume...
Page 112 - The golden age of English oratory, which extends over the last quarter of the eighteenth and the first quarter of the nineteenth centuries, produced no speaker, either in Parliament or at the Bar, superior in persuasive force and artistic finish to Thomas Lord Erskine.
Page 62 - America, as a body, and its literary men or even its artists, in the respects of devotion to truth, of simple confidence in the right, of delight in good work for good work's sake, of indisposition to coin name and fame into money, of unwillingness to use -one thing that is well done as a means of passing off upon the public three or four things that are ill done. I know the scientific men of America well, and I entertain a profound conviction that in sincerity, simplicity, fidelity, and generosity...
Page 120 - ... object distinctly subordinate to gladiatorial prowess, and who are graduated really, if they are graduated at all, in athletics as a major, with classics, or mathematics, or philosophy, or something else as a minor,— or perhaps we should say a minimum. Certainly, this presents a view of college life which would have filled with horror the founders and early governors of our New England colleges. And it needs to be said at the outset, in dealing with this subject, that there are hosts of young...
Page 120 - The college athletics of to-day do wonderfully light up the life of our people. The great recurring contests and the intermediate practice games and friendly competitions of the several teams give acute delight to a large and increasing constituency. This nation has long shown the painful need of more in the way of popular amusement, of more that shall call men in great throngs out into the open air, of more that shall arouse an interest in something besides money-getting or professional preferment....

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