Embroidered Facts

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Orr and Smith, Paternoster-Row, 1836 - 153 pages

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Page 103 - The gods, in bounty, work up storms about us, That give mankind occasion to exert Their hidden strength, and throw out into practice Virtues, which shun the day, and lie conceal'd In the smooth seasons and the calms of life.
Page 137 - Ambition this shall tempt to rise, Then whirl the wretch from high, To bitter Scorn a sacrifice, And grinning Infamy. The stings of Falsehood those shall try And hard Unkindness...
Page 121 - Stone walls do not a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage; If I have freedom in my love And in my soul am free, Angels alone, that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.
Page 83 - The wind did blow, the cloak did fly. Like streamer long and gay, Till, loop and button failing both, At last it flew away.
Page 67 - Flies from the fist ; the crow so near pursued, Shall be compell'd to seek protection under Our horses bellies ; a hearn put from her siege,' And a pistol shot off in her breech, shall mount So high, that, to your view...
Page 43 - Solario, a wandering gypsy tinker, fell deeply in love with the daughter of the painter Coll' Antonio del Fiore, but was told that no one but a painter as good as the father should wed the maiden. " Will you give me ten years to learn to paint, and so entitle myself to the hand of your daughter?
Page 98 - ... the nobility and officers of the crown. John was a little frightened, and drew close to his attendant; but was still unable to distinguish the King. " I told you that you should know him by his wearing his hat," said the conductor. " Then," said John, after he had again looked around the room, " it must be either you or me, for all but, us two are bare-headed.
Page 37 - If those glories You so set forth were mine, they might plead for me; But I can lay no claim to the least honour Which you, with foul injustice, ravish from her. Her beauty in me wrought a miracle, Taught me to aim at things beyond my power, Which her perfections purchased, and gave to me From her free bounties ; she inspired me with That valour which I dare not call mine own ; And, from the fair reflection of her mind, My soul received the sparkling beams of courage.
Page 98 - So speaking, King James introduced the countryman into a great hall, which was filled by the nobility and officers of the crown. John was a little frightened, and drew close to his attendant; but was still unable to distinguish the King. " I told you that you should know him by his wearing his hat,
Page 97 - how am I to know his grace from the nobles who will be all about him?' 'Easily,' replied his companion; 'all others will be bare-headed, the King alone will wear his hat or bonnet.' "So speaking, King James introduced the countryman into a great hall which was filled by the nobility and officers of the crown. John was a little frightened, and drew close to his attendant; but was still unable to distinguish the King. 'I told you that you should know him by his wearing his hat...

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