Oceanographers and the Cold War: Sisciples of Marine Science

Front Cover
University of Washington Press, Jul 1, 2005 - Science - 368 pages
0 Reviews
This book examines the study of the oceans during the Cold War era and explores the international focus of American oceanographers, taking into account the role of the U.S. Navy, U.S. foreign policy, and scientists through the world. Hamblin demonstrates that to understand the history of American oceanography, one must consider its role in both conflict and cooperation with other nations. Scientists redefined the field of oceanography and turned it into one of the most well-funded, militarily decisive, and politically controversial activities in science.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Beginnings of Postwar Marine Science and Cooperation
3
2 Oceanographys Greatest Patron
32
3 The International Geophysical Year 19571958
59
4 The New Face of International Oceanography
99
5 Competition and Cooperation in the 1960s
140
6 Oceanography East and West
177
7 Marine Science and Marine Affairs
217
8 Conclusion
259
Notes
267
Bibliography
307
Index
333
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Jacob Darwin Hamblin is a lecturer in history at California State University in Long Beach.

Bibliographic information