The Phenomena and Laws of Heat

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Scribner's, 1897 - Heat - 273 pages
 

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Page 270 - ... communication with the outer atmosphere, and immediately igniting the mixture, the piston being pushed forward by the pressure of the ignited gases during the remainder of its stroke. The in-stroke then discharges the products of combustion. (2.) An engine in which a mixture of gas and air is drawn into a pump, and is discharged by the return stroke into a reservoir in a state of compression.. From the reservoir the mixture enters into a cylinder, being ignited as it enters, without rise in pressure,...
Page 209 - Over the surface curls a light vapor; the water is of the purest azure, and tints with its lovely hue the fantastic incrustations on the cistern walls; while at the bottom is often seen the mouth of the once mighty geyser. There are in Iceland vast, but now extinct geyser operations.
Page 255 - F.), which is not greater than that of Cairo and all Lower Egypt. " The difference between the mean temperature of the hottest month and that of the coldest is 12 C.
Page 269 - An engine drawing into its cylinder gas and air at atmospheric pressure, for a portion of its stroke, cutting off communication with the outer atmosphere, and immediately igniting the mixture, the piston being pushed forward by the pressure of the ignited gases during the remainder of its stroke. The in-stroke then discharges the products of combustion.
Page 270 - ... mixture of gas and air is compressed or introduced under compression into a cylinder or space at the end of a cylinder, and then ignited while the volume remains constant and the pressure rises. Under this pressure the piston moves forward, and the return stroke discharges the exhaust. Types 1 and 3 are explosion engines, the volume of the mixture remaining constant while the Fio.
Page 270 - From the reservoir the mixture enters a cylinder, being ignited as it enters without rise in pressure, but simply increased in volume, and following the piston as it moves forward. The return stroke discharges the products of combustion. (3) An engine in which a mixture of gas and air is compressed, or introduced under compression, into a cylinder or space at the end of a cylinder, and then ignited while the volume remains constant, and the pressure rises. Under this pressure the piston moves forward,...
Page 272 - ... liquefied in a tube contained in a smaller box placed above the first large one. Two compressionpumps take the carbonic acid in a gaseous state from a gasometer, and compress it into the tube contained in the small box. This tube forms a reservoir of liquid carbonic acid, and must be made very cold. It is enveloped by a larger tube containing liquid sulphurous oxide, which is continually vaporized. The liquid sulphurous oxide is constantly provided from a reservoir or condenser, and the duty...
Page 267 - ... a hot chimney instead of a comparatively cool one. Therefore, no loss to the furnace is incurred in cooling the gas on its way to the regenerative chambers, and the temperature of the gas is utilized to produce the very essential mechanical effect of urging the gas from the producer to the furnace. The economical action of the furnace depends upon the circumstance that the products of combustion reach the chimney, not at the temperature of the heating chamber, as is the case when ordinary furnaces...
Page 81 - Have you ever seen this stone in the chemist's shops, the beautiful and transparent one, from which they kindle fire? SOCRATES. Do you mean the burning-glass? STREPSIADES. I do. Come what would you say, pray, if I were to take this, when the clerk was entering the suit, and were to stand at a distance, in the direction of the sun, thus, and melt out the letters of my suit?
Page 267 - ... high temperatures, whereas for the attainment of low temperatures, such as the heating of boilers, the economy would be comparatively small. Its practical economical result for high temperatures is well illustrated by the fact that in melting steel in pots in the ordinary air furnace at Sheffield, 3 tons of Durham coke are required to melt a ton of steel, whereas a ton of small coal suffices to melt a ton of steel in the same pots when the regenerative gas furnace is employed. In melting steel...

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