The Letters of Junius

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M. Carey, no. 122, Market street, 1807 - English letters - 317 pages
 

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Page 291 - That king James the Second, having endeavoured to subvert the Constitution of the Kingdom, by breaking the original Contract between king and people, and, by the advice of Jesuits, and other wicked persons, having violated the fundamental Laws, and having withdrawn himself out of the Kingdom, has abdicated the Government, and that the Throne is thereby become vacant.
Page 2 - Let it be impressed upon your minds, let it be instilled into your children, that the liberty of the press is the palladium of all the civil, political, and religious rights of an Englishman...
Page 18 - If, on the contrary, we see an universal spirit of distrust and dissatisfaction, a rapid decay of trade, dissensions in all parts of the Empire, and a total loss of respect in the eyes of foreign powers, we may pronounce, without hesitation, that the Government of that country is weak, distracted and corrupt.
Page 2 - What yesterday was fact, to-day is doctrine. Examples are supposed to justify the most dangerous measures ; and where they do not suit exactly, the. defect is supplied by analogy. Be assured, that the laws, which protect us in our civil rights^ grow out of the constitution, and they must fall or flourish with it.. This is not the cause of faction^ or of party, or of any individual, but the common interest of every man in Britain...
Page 170 - Instead of those certain positive rules by which the judgment of a court of law should invariably be determined, you have fondly introduced your own unsettled notions of equity and substantial justice. Decisions given upon such principles do not alarm the public so much as they ought, because the consequence and tendency of each particular instance is not observed or regarded. In the...
Page 130 - ... the dearest tribute of their affections. Such, Sir, was once the disposition of a people who now surround your throne with reproaches and complaints. Do justice to yourself. Banish from your mind those unworthy opinions with which some interested persons have laboured to possess you.
Page 284 - When you propose to cut away the rotten parts, can you tell us what parts are perfectly sound ? Are there any certain limits in fact or theory, to inform you at what point you must stop, at what point the mortification ends ? To a man so capable of observation and reflection as you are, it is unnecessary to say all that might be said upon the subject. Besides that I approve highly of lord Chatham's idea of infusing a portion of new health into the constitution, to enable it to bear its infirmities...
Page 138 - How easy, how safe and honourable is the path before you! The English nation declare they are grossly injured by their representatives, and solicit your Majesty to exert your lawful prerogative, and give them an opportunity of recalling a trust which they find has been scandalously abused.
Page 1 - When kings and ministers are forgotten, when the force . and direction of personal satire is no longer understood, and when measures are only felt in their remotest consequences, .this book will, I believe, be found to contain principles worthy to be transmitted to posterity.
Page 256 - Junius considers the right of taxing the colonies, by an act of the British legislature, as a speculative right merely, never to be exerted, nor ever to be renounced. To his judgment it appears plain, "That the general reasonings which were employed against that power, went directly to our whole legislative right ; and that one part of it could not be yielded to such arguments, without- a virtual surrender of all the rest.

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