The Works of Laurence Sterne: In One Volume, with a Life of the Author

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J. Grigg, 1831 - English literature - 416 pages
 

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Page 302 - I was going to begin with the millions of my fellow-creatures born to no inheritance but slavery ; but finding, however affecting the picture was, that I could not bring it near me, and that the multitude of sad groups in it did but distract me, I took a single captive, and having first shut him up in his dungeon, I then looked through the twilight of his grated door to take his picture.
Page 301 - Tis thou, thrice sweet and gracious goddess, addressing myself to LIBERTY, whom all in public or in private worship, whose taste is grateful, and ever will be so, till NATURE herself shall change...
Page 180 - I wish, said my uncle Toby, with a deep sigh, — I wish, Trim, I was asleep. Your honour, replied the corporal, is too much concerned; — shall I pour your honour out a glass of sack to your pipe? Do, Trim, said my uncle Toby.
Page 220 - He turned his head thoughtful about, and looked wistfully the opposite way I understand thee perfectly, answered I If thou takest a wrong step in this affair, he will cudgel thee to death Well ! a minute is but a minute, and if it saves a fellow-creature a drubbing, it shall not be set down as ill spent.
Page 179 - Trim, said my uncle Toby, blowing his nose, but that thou art a good-natured fellow. When I gave him the toast, continued the Corporal, I thought it was proper to tell him I was Captain Shandy's servant, and that your honour (though a stranger) was extremely concerned for his father ; and that if there was any thing in your house or cellar, — (And thou mightst have added my purse too, said my uncle Toby), — he was heartily welcome to it.
Page 52 - Go,' says he one day at dinner to an overgrown one which had buzzed about his nose and tormented him cruelly all dinner time, and which, after infinite attempts he had caught at last, as it flew by him ; — 'I'll not hurt thee,' says my Uncle Toby, rising from his chair and going across the room with the fly in his hand ; 'I'll not hurt a hair of thy head. Go...
Page 180 - Billy, said he, - the boy flew across the room to the bedside - and falling down upon his knee, took the ring in his hand, and kissed it too, - then kissed his father, and sat down upon the bed and wept. I wish, said my uncle Toby, with a deep sigh, - I wish, Trim, I was asleep.
Page 284 - What a large volume of adventures may be grasped within this little span of life, by him who interests his heart in every thing, and who, having eyes to see what time and chance are perpetually holding out to him as he journeyeth on his way, misses nothing he can fairly lay his hands on...
Page 360 - I am glad that you are in love: 'twill cure you at least of the spleen, which has a bad effect on both man and woman. I myself must ever have some Dulcinea in my head; it...
Page 244 - It is not in the white; said Mrs Wadman: my uncle Toby look'd with might and main into the pupil Now of all the eyes, which ever were created from your own, Madam, up to those of Venus herself, which certainly were as venereal a pair of eyes as ever stood in a head there never was an eye of them all, so fitted to rob my uncle Toby of his repose, as...

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