The Cambridge Companion to Ballet

Front Cover
Marion Kant
Cambridge University Press, Jun 7, 2007 - Music - 353 pages
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Ballet is a paradox: much loved but little studied. It is a beautiful fairy tale; detached from its origins and unrelated to the men and women who created it. Yet ballet has a history, little known and rarely presented. These great works have dark sides and moral ambiguities, not always nor immediately visible. The daring and challenging quality of ballet as well as its perceived 'safe' nature is not only one of its fascinations but one of the intriguing questions to be explored in this Companion. The essays reveal the conception, intent and underlying meaning of ballets and recreate the historical reality in which they emerged. The reader will find new and unexpected aspects of ballet, its history and its aesthetics, the evolution of plot and narrative, new insights into the reality of training, the choice of costume and the transformation of an old art in a modern world.
 

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Contents

Introduction Marion Kant
1
Ballet de cour Marina Nordera 19
19
English masques Barbara Ravelhofer 32
32
the ballet daction of
53
John Weaver and the Enlightenment
78
The French Revolution and its spectacles Inge Baxmann 98
98
18301850 Sarah Davis Cordova 113
113
the women in the Danish romantic
126
The soul of the shoe Marion Kant 184
184
the Ballets Suedois and its modernist
201
George Balanchine Matilde Butkas 224
224
Balanchine and the deconstruction of classicism Juliet Bellow 237
237
ballets sinicisation
256
European ballet in the age of ideologies Marion Kant 272
272
Notes 291
291
Bibliography and further reading 311
311

Russian ballet in the age of Petipa Lynn Garafola 151
151
Tchaikovskys ballet
164

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About the author (2007)

Marion Kant teaches at the University of Pennsylvania.

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