Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic][merged small]

PAGE

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

PAGE

PREFATORY NOTE BY W. M. ROSSETTI ix DRAMAS-

SATIRES-

Manfred

Marino Faliero, Doge of Venice

English Bards and Scotch Reviewers

Heaven and Earth: A Mystery

The Curse of Minerva

Sardanapalus

Child Harold's PILGRIMAGE. A Ro-

The Two Foscari

The Deformed Transformed
maunt-

Cain: A Mystery

Canto the First

17 Werner; or, The Inheritance

Canto the Second

26

Canto the Third

36 Don JUAN-

Canto the Fourth

47 Canto the First

The Waltz: An Apostrophic Hymn .

Canto the Second

65

Canto the Third

TALES-

Canto the Fourth

Canto the Fifth .

The Giaour

69

Canto the Sixth .

The Bride of Abydos: A Turkish Taie-

Canto the Seventh

Canto the First

80

Canto the Second :

Canto the Eighth

84

Canto the Ninth

The Corsair-

Canto the Tenth

Canto the First

92 Canto the Eleventh

Canto the Second :

Canto the Twelfth

Canto the Third

102 Canto the Thirteenth

Lara-

Canto the Fourteenth

Canto the First

109 Canto the Fifteenth

Canto the Second

114 Canto the Sixteenth :

The Siege of Corinth

Parisina

HOURS OF IDLENESS-

The Prisoner of Chillon

134 On the Death of a Young Lady,

Beppo

138 Cousin to the Author

Mazeppa

To E-

The Island-

To D-

Canto the First

153 Epitaph on a Friend

Canto the Second

155 A Fragment

Canto the Third

159 On Leaving Newstead Abbey

Canto the Fourth

161 Lines written in “Letters of an

Italian Nun and

THE PROPHECY OF DANTI-

an English

Gentleman," with Answer

Canto the First .

Adrian's Address to his Soul when

Canto the Second

168 Dying

Canto the Third

169 Translation from Catullus :

Canto the Fourth

171

Translation of the Epitaph on Virgii

The Blues: A Literary Eclogue

and Tibullus

Imitation of Tibullus

The Vision of JUDGMENT

Translation from Catullus .

177

Imitated from Catullus

THE AGE OF BRONZE .

187 Translation from Horace

I 20

129

[blocks in formation]

a

[ocr errors]

HOURS OF IDLENESS-Continued-

From Anacreon.

From Anacreon.

From the Prometheus Vinctus of Æs

chylus.

To Emma

To M. S. G.

To Caroline

To Caroline

To Caroline

Stanzas to a Lady, with the Poems of

Camoëns

The First Kiss of Love

On a Change of Masters at a Great

Public School

To the Duke of Dorset

Fragment, written shortly after the

Marriage of Miss Chaworth

Granta: A Medley

On a Distant View of the Village and

School of Harrow-on-the-Hill

To M

To Woman

To M. S. G.

To Mary, on receiving her Picture

To Lesbia.

Lines addressed to a Young Lady,

who had been alarmed at the

sound of a Bullet fired by the

Author

Love's Last Adieu

Damætas

To Marion.

To a Lady, who presented to the

Author a Lock of Hair braided

with his own

Oscar of Alva: A Tale

The Episode of Nisus and Euryalus

Translation from the Medea of Euri-

pides

Thoughts suggested by a College Ex:

amination

To a Beautiful Quaker

The Cornelian

An Occasional Prologue, delivered

previous to the Performance of

The Wheel of Fortune at a Pri-

vate Theatre

On the Death of Mr Fox :

The Tear

Reply to some Verses of J. Ń. B.

Pigot, Esq.

To the Sighing Strephon

To Eliza

Lachin

у

Gair

To Romance

Answer to some Elegant Verses, sent

by a Friend to the Author

Elegy on Newstead Abbey

Childish Recollections

Answer to a Beautiful Poem, entitled

“The Common Lot"

Lines addressed to the Rev. J. 1.

Becher

The Death of Calmar and Orla :

To Edward Noel Long, Esq.

To a Lady

I would I were à Careless Child

When I roved a Young Highlander

To George, Earl Delawarr

[blocks in formation]

556
556

579
579
579
579
579

557
557

580

587
587

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[graphic][merged small]

GEORGE GORDON LORD BYRON, a Baron of the United Kingdom, was born on the 22d of January 1788, in Holles Street, London. He traced his descent from the time of the Conquest : his ancestor Ralph de Burun is recorded in Domesday Book. The Byrons or Birons, having been Knights long before, and Baronets also, were raised to the peerage by Charles I., whose cause the family espoused. The poet was the only son of Captain John Byron, of the Guards, by his second wife, Catharine Gordon of Gight, an Aberdeenshire heiress, belonging to the senior branch of the Gordons, and having some Stuart blood in her veins. John Byron was a nephew of William, the then Lord. A spendthrift and rake, he had aforetime eloped with Lady Carmarthen, who, on being divorced from her husband, became the first wife of Captain Byron, and bore him one daughter, Augusta Mary, afterwards the Honourable Mrs Leigh. The celebrated Admiral Byron was the poet's grandfather.

Byron was born (it would appear, though the accounts are conflicting) with both feet clubbed, and with legs withered to the knee: the right foot, owing to an accident attending birth, was more particularly distorted. In other respects he grew up extremely handsome ; with lightblue or greyish eyes, dark auburn hair curling over the head, and a complexion almost colourless. His stature was five feet eight and a half. He had a constitutional tendency to fatness, which he kept down by a diet abstemious to the point of semi-starvation, although occasionally he neglected his precautions, and paid the forfeit. Extreme sensitiveness to his lameness, even apart from the practical inconvenience which it caused, embittered his entire life.

Captain Byron squandered his second wife's fortune, and left her to shift for herself. Reduced to an income of £150 a year, she retired with her infant, in 1790, to Aberdeen: a proud, impetuous, inflammable woman, who spoiled the child by frequent petting, and more frequent violences. In her moods, she would call him “a lame brat;” and the opprobrious term rankled in his memory. Inheriting the characteristic defects of both his parents, with a gloomy heart though much superficial gaiety of spirits, with many generous impulses and passionate susceptibilities, he underwent no training that would have elicited his finer and climinated his more perilous qualities. His father soon levanted to the continent, and died at Valenciennes in 1791.

Byron's schooling began at the age of five; and he had been under three instructors before he passed to the Free-school of Aberdeen. The son of the reigning Lord Byron died before his father; the lord himself

[ocr errors]
« PreviousContinue »