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ing of the Sovereigns within a reasonable period. Whilst such reunions continue, peace will be secure.

I trust the Queen will last long enough to allow your lordship to finish all leading points at least ; and I suppose the Emperor of Russia, unless he shall wish, for the sake of climate, to pass his winter at Aix-la-Chapelle, will very early bring forward those points he wishes to be carried ; and his indifference or unwillingness to bind himself on other points, will lead him to break up as soon as his own plans are settled.

I am getting much better, and I think freer from disorder than I have been for some years; but I am rather weak and nervous, and am confined to low diet. If you wish me to do anything, I have leisure enough, and I think spirits.

Believe me, &c., E. COOKE.

END OF VOL. XI.

SEP 2. 1920

F. Sboberl, Rupert Street, Haymarket.

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the obvious answer to any such application to the French Government would be, that the affair of the conspirators was proceeding in their courts of law, according to their forms, with which no foreign State could assume any right of interference; and that to such an answer it would be impossible to reply—but that, if his Royal Highness, early in May last, when they were together at Brussels, had taken his Majesty's advice, and gone directly thence to Cambray to the Duke, and laid open his whole mind to his Grace on the subject, his feelings would long since have been relieved; that still communication with the Duke of Wellington must be the only way of affording him relief; and he must therefore wait with patience till he should be enabled to have a personal interview with his Grace. This correspondence was not, as I understand, conducted in the most gentle terms on either side, and this accounts for the fact of neither party having taken measures for seeing the other since the late delivery of the Princess. I shall write, by this conveyance, a few words to the Duke of Wellington, whom I suppose still to be in England, urging him, on the above grounds, to endeavour to make this his way to Cambray and Paris. If the present state of the parties towards each other will admit of an accord between father and son upon the subject, the christening of the young Prince will probably take place on the 24th, the anniversary of the King's birth, and thus two matters become discharged at once. If so, whenever else the baptism shall take place, his Majesty purposes to proceed on the next day to the Loo, and dismiss us from attendance till his repair to Bruxelles. I shall, therefore, set out for that place as soon after the baptism as possible, in the hope of meeting you, and taking such directions as you may have to give on your passage to Aix. It would be a great convenience to me to know as nearly as can be the date assigned for your probable arrival there. Yours, my dear lord, &c., CLANCARTY.

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