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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues....
" Lord. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together : our virtues would be proud, if our faults whipped them not; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues. "
The Pictorial edition of the works of Shakspere, ed. by C. Knight. [8 vols ... - Page 48
by William Shakespeare - 1838
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1803
...confirmations, point from point, to the full arming of the verity. 2 Lord. I am heartily sorry, that he'll be glad of this. 1 Lord. How mightily, sometimes,...not; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherish'd by our •virtues.— Enter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Serv. He met the duke...
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The speaker, or Miscellaneous pieces, selected from the best English writers ...

William Enfield - 1804
...twenty to follow my own teaching. Men's evil manners live in brass ; their virtues we write in water. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and...despair , if they were not cherished by our virtues. The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the poor beetle that we tread upon , In corporal sufferance,...
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The plays of William Shakespeare ...: With the corrections and ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare, Joseph Dennie, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1805
...to the point of her death : her death itself, which could not be her office to say, is come," was'7 faithfully confirmed by the rector of the place. 2...not; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherish'd by our virtues. Enter a Servant. How now? where 's your master? Serv. He met the duke in...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1805
...confirmations, point from point, to the full arming of the verity. 2 Lord. I am heartily sorry, that he'll be glad of this. 1 Lord. How mightily, sometimes,...not; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherish'd by our virtues. — Enter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Serv. He met the duke...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare : Accurately Printed from the ..., Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1805
...confirmations, point from point, to the full arming of the verity. Q, Lord. I am heartily sorry, that he'll be glad of this. 1 Lord. How mightily, sometimes,...not; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherish'd by our virtues.— Enter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Serv. He met the duke...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare ...: With the Corrections and ..., Volume 5

William Shakespeare - 1806
...Lord. I am heartily sorry, that he '11 be glad of this. 1 Lord. How mightily, sometimes, we make vis comforts of our losses! 2 Lord. And how mightily,...not; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherish'd by our virtues. Enter a Servant. How now? where 's your master? Scrv. He met the duke in...
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The Plays of Shakspeare: Printed from the Text of Samuel Johnson ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1807
...sorry, that he'll be glad of this. 1 Lord. How mightily, sometimes, we make us comforts of our losses! valour hath here acquired for him, shall at home be...not; and our crimes would despair, if they were not cherish'd by our virtues.— Enter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Sen. He met the duke...
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The Speaker, or, Miscellaneous pieces: selected from the best English ...

Language Arts & Disciplines - 1808 - 400 pages
...twenty to follow my own teaching. Men's evil manners live in brass ; th«ir virtues we write .in water. The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and...despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues. ' The sense of death is most in apprehension ; And the poor beetle that we tread upon, In corporal...
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The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1810
...point, to the full arming of the verity. 2 Lord. I am heartily sorry, that he'll be glad of this. I Lord. How mightily, sometimes, we make us comforts...cherished by our virtues. — Enter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Ser. He met the duke in the street, sir, of whom he hath taken a solemn leave...
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The Works of William Shakespeare: In Nine Volumes, Volume 3

William Shakespeare - 1810
...confirmations, point from point, to the full arming of the verity. 2 Lord. I am heartily sorry, that he'll be glad of this. 1 Lord. How mightily, sometimes,...despair, if they were not cherished by our virtues. — Łnter a Servant. How now ? where's your master ? Ser. He met the duke in the street, sir, of whom...
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