My Sister Rosalind Franklin

Front Cover
OUP Oxford, Mar 22, 2012 - Science - 192 pages
Rosalind Franklin is famous in the history of science for her contribution to the discovery of the structure of DNA, the start of the greatest biological revolution of the twentieth century. Much has been written about the importance of her part, and about how her work was affected by her position as a woman scientist. Above all she was a distinguished scientist, not only in her work on DNA, but also in her earlier work on coals and carbons and in her later work on viruses. In this family memoir her sister, the writer and historian Jenifer Glynn, paints a full picture of Rosalind's life. Looking at Rosalind's background; her early education, her time as a science student at Cambridge, and her relations with her family, to her life as an adult and her time in Paris and at King's, Glynn shows how much her sister achieved and how she was influenced by the social and intellectual climate of the period she worked in.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Notting Hill
1
2 Childhood and Early Schooling
12
3 Early Education of a Scientist
24
4 A Science Student in Wartime Cambridge
38
5 A False Start
59
6 Winning the War with Coals and Carbons
69
7 Happiness in Paris
82
8 Misery in London
112
9 Viruses Models and Success
133
10 Afterlife
154
Notes
161
Index
165
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Jenifer Glynn read History at Cambridge and is the author of several books, including Prince of Publishers (1986), about the Victorian publisher George Smith, and The Pioneering Garretts: breaking the barriers for women (2008).

Bibliographic information