History of Longleat

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1856/ 30p/ WT.104.6

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Page 23 - Yratz," the King having permitted that his body should be transported to his own country, he being of good family, and one of the first embalmed by a particular art invented by one William Russell. The flesh was florid as if the person was sleeping. He had been dead now nearly fifteen days, and lay exposed in a very rich coffin lined with lead, too magnificent (says Evelyn) for so horrid a murderer. In this affair, therefore, the most guilty was acquitted, the next most guilty (Vratz) was honourably...
Page 21 - Vrats told a friend of mine who accompanied him to the gallows, and gave him some advice, that he did not value dying of a rush, and hoped and believed God...
Page 27 - When I, my Lord, crush'd by prevailing Might, No Cottage had where to direct my Flight, Kind Heav'n me with a Friend Illustrious bless'd, Who gives me Shelter, Affluence and Rest.
Page 34 - This magnificent estate, so far from being locked up to exclude mankind from partaking of its scenery, is always open, and visitors are allowed freely to amuse themselves; which circumstance tends to enliven the scene; to extend a more general knowledge of its beauty to strangers; and to mark the liberality of the noble proprietor, in thus deigning to share with others the good he enjoys.
Page 33 - THERE is a bird, who by his coat, And by the hoarseness of his note, Might be supposed a crow; A great frequenter of the church, Where bishoplike he finds a perch, And dormitory too. Above the steeple shines a plate, That turns and turns, to indicate From what point blows the weather. Look up— your brains begin to swim, 'Tis in the clouds— that pleases him...
Page 34 - This magnificent park, so far from being kept locked up to exclude mankind from partaking of its scenery, is always open, and parties are permitted to bring their refreshments; which circumstance tends to enliven the scene, to extend a more general knowledge of its beauties to strangers, and to mark the liberality of its noble proprietor, in thus deigning to participate with others the good he enjoys.
Page 27 - Ken's memory to say, this upper chamber, and the walks and gardens, woods and glades, which he frequented, give a hallowed character to Longleat. He made occasional visits to his nephew, Isaac Walton, jun., the Rector of Poulshot, and other friends. Now and then he was in London, sometimes at Winchester, Bath, Bristol, &c. ; but Longleat was the principal witness of his future trials, his temptations, aud his disquietudes. These last were to follow him wherever he might go ; for what refuge of peace,...
Page 6 - Francis Thynne, son of William, was not only Lancaster Herald and a great collector of English historical antiquities, but also a writer: though, as often is the case, he laboured for others to reap where he had sown. " Whosoever," (says Fuller) " shall peruse the voluminous works of Ralph Holinshed (the chronicler) will find how much he was assisted therein by the help of Mr. Francis Thynne, seeing the shoulders of Atlas himself may be weary, if not sometimes beholden to Hercules, to relieve him.
Page 24 - Weymouth laid out his ground according to the plan shown in the old engraving of the house by Kip: groves and long avenues, with vistas and artificial mounds, were planted; the original leat was widened at intervals into fish-ponds, all rigorously angular ; flower beds were described in chequered and geometric figures; the very gooseberry and currant bushes in the kitchen garden...
Page 27 - Lord, crush' d by prevailing Might, No Cottage had where to direct my Flight ; Kind Heav'n me with a Friend Illustrious blest, Who gives me Shelter, Affluence, and Rest...

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