Vesuvius

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Clarendon Press, 1869 - Vesuvius (Italy) - 355 pages
 

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Page 14 - He was, at that time, with the fleet under his command, at Misenum. On the 24th of August, about one . in the afternoon, my mother desired him to observe a. cloud, which appeared of a very unusual size and shape. He had just returned from taking the benefit of the sun, and, after bathing himself in cold water, and taking a slight repast, was retired to his study.
Page 1 - Kennst du das Land, wo die Zitronen blühn, Im dunkeln Laub die Gold-Orangen glühn, Ein sanfter Wind vom blauen Himmel weht, Die Myrte still und hoch der Lorbeer steht, Kennst du es wohl? Dahin! Dahin Möcht ich mit dir, o mein Geliebter, ziehn.
Page 14 - ... ruins, and destroyed so many populous cities, seems to promise him an everlasting remembrance ; notwithstanding he has himself composed many and lasting works ; yet I am persuaded the mentioning of him in your immortal writings will greatly contribute to eternize his name.
Page 24 - At length a glimmering light appeared, which we imagined to be rather the forerunner of an approachingburst of flames, as in truth it was, than the return of day. However, the fire fell at a distance from us ; then again we were immersed in thick darkness, and a heavy shower of ashes rained upon us, which we were obliged every now and then to shake off, otherwise we should have been crushed and buried in the heap.
Page 24 - I was perishing with the world itself. At last this dreadful darkness was dissipated by degrees, like a cloud of smoke ; the real day returned, and even the sun appeared, though very faintly, and as when an eclipse is coming on. Every object that presented itself to our •eyes (which were extremely weakened) seemed changed, being covered over with white ashes, as with a deep snow.
Page 16 - When hastening to the place from whence others fled with the utmost terror, he steered his direct course to the point of danger, and with so .much calmness and presence of mind, as to be able to make and dictate...
Page 20 - The letter which, in compliance with your request, I wrote to you concerning the death of my uncle, has raised, it seems, your curiosity to know what terrors and dangers attended me while I continued at Misenum ; for there, I think, the account in my former broke off. 'Though my shock'd soul recoils, my tongue shall tell.
Page 15 - It was not at that distance discernible from what mountain this cloud issued, but it was found afterwards to ascend from Mount Vesuvius. I cannot give a more exact description of its f1gure than by resembling it to that of a pine-tree, for it shot up to a great height in the form of a trunk, which extended itself at the top into a sort of branches...
Page 23 - The ashes now began to fall upon us, though in no great quantity. I turned my head, and observed behind us a thick smoke, which came rolling after us like a torrent. I proposed, while we had yet...
Page 13 - Your request that I would send you an account of my uncle's death, in order to transmit a more exact relation of it to posterity, deserves my acknowledgments ; for, if this accident shall be celebrated by your pen, the glory of it, I am well assured, will be rendered for ever illustrious.

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