Time, Policy, Management: Governing with the Past

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OUP Oxford, May 1, 2008 - Political Science - 232 pages
In this important new book, Christopher Pollitt, one of the leading researchers in public policy and management, argues that we are guilty of neglecting a fundamental dimension of both the practice and study of contemporary public policymaking and management: that of time. Pollitt traces the character of, and the reasons for, this neglect in his wide-ranging study. He considers the theoretical options for addressing time in a more sophisticated way, and applies these perspectives both to his own research and that of many others. Finally he looks at the implications for practitioners. Pollitt's analysis draws on an exceptionally wide range of work from many fields, sectors, and countries. It is rich in examples, concepts, and methods. It poses fundamental questions about some central tendencies in 21st century policymaking, and opens up a new direction for academic research.
 

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Contents

1 The End of Time?
1
2 TimeshipsNavigating the Past
30
3 History in ActionA Tale of Two Hospitals
75
4 Beyond History?
90
5 Review and ReInterpretation
120
6 A Toolkit for Time?
142
7 Wider Implications for Governments
159
8 After All
179
References
186
Index
201
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About the author (2008)

Christopher Pollitt is one of the leading international researchers in the field of public management and policy. Winner of the 2004 Hans Sigrist International Prize for 'outstanding comparative research in the field of governmental reform' he has published many books and articles, and has also acted as an advisor to national governments, the European Commission, the OECD and the World Bank. Currently Research Professor of Public Management at Leuven, he has previously held professorships at Brunel University and Erasmus University Rotterdam. He is also Editor in Chief of the International Review of Administrative Sciences, and was previously Editor of Public Administration.

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