History of English Literature

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American Book Exchange, 1880 - English literature - 722 pages
 

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Contents

Wherein Chaucer was English and originalIdea of character and individualVan
96
Connection of philosophy and poetryHow general notions failed under
104
Idea which men had formed of the world since the dissolution of the
107
ModelsThe ancientsTranslation and study of classical authorsSympathy
113
Pastoral poetryThe great number of poetsSpirit and force of the poetryState
126
The Faerie QueeneImpossible eventsHow they appear naturalBelpkozbe
135
Prose
143
Robert BurtonHis life and characterVastness and confusion of his acquirements
149
CHAPTER II
158
The poetsGeneral harmony between the character of a poet and that of his
166
Formation of this dramaThe process and character of this artImitative
173
CHAPTER III
186
parison of Adam and Eve with an English familyComparison of God and
193
ComediesHis reformation and theory of the theatreSatirical comedies
194
General idea of ShakspeareThe fundamental idea in ShakspeareConditions
209
VillainsIago Richard III How excessive lusts and the lack of conscience
234
Reformation in EnglandTyranny of the ecclesiastical courtsDisorders of
246
The AnglicansClose connection between religion and societyHow the religious
256
The PuritansOpposition of religion and the worldDogmasMoralityr
263
BunyanHis life spirit and poetical workThe Prospect of Protestantism
271
CHAPTER VI
277
Miltons residence in London and the countryGeneral appearance
284
BOOK ni THE CLASSIC
309
Philosophy consonant with these mannersHobbes his spirit and his styleHis
318
WycherleyLifeCharacterMelancholy greed immodestyLove in a Wood
324
Sir William TempleHis life character spirit and style
332
Sir John DenhamHis poem of Coopers Hill Oratorical swell of his verse
339
X The continuation of comedySheridanLifeTalent The School for Scandal
353
The theatres reopened and transformedThe new public and the new tasteDra
361
Style of his dramaRhymed verseFlowery dictionPedantic tiradesWant
368
Dryden as a writerKind scope and limits of his mindClumsiness in flattery
375
Rise of the art of writingDifference between the stamp of mind of the artistic
381
Brutality of the peopleGin RiotsCorruption of the greatPolitical manners
387
GoldsmithPurification of the novelPicture of citizen life upright happiness
478
X HogarthMoral and realistic paintingContrast of English temperament
484
Descriptive talentOratorical talentDidactic poemsWhy these poems are
495
MODERN LIFE
507
Conservative rule in EnglandAt first the Revolution affects the style only
519
V Philosophy enters into literatureWordsworthCharacterConditionLife
531
Life and character of ShakspeareFamilyYouthMarriageHe becomes
532
CHAPTER II
538
ManfredComparison of Manfred and FaustConception of legend and life
551
Position of Byron in his ageDisease of the ageDivine conceptions of happiness
563
The presentConcordances of observation and historySkySoilProducts
569
Agriculture
576
Contrast of German and Latin racesCharacter of the Saxon raceIts endurance
581
PAGE
583
Circumstances which gave rise to the novels of the eighteenth centuryAll these
584
The objects to which he directs his enthusiasmHis trivialities and minuteness
589
Two classes of charactersNatural and instinctive charactersArtificial and posi
597
CHAPTER II
603
Solidity and precision of this satirical conceptionResemblance of Thackeray
611
The artistIdea of pure artWherein satire injures artWhereir it diminishes
618
CHAPTER III
627
His talentTaste for demonstrationTaste for developmentOratorical character
633
Comparison of Macaulay with French historiansWherein he is classicalWherein
647
Barriers which hold and direct himPerception of the real and of the sublime
654
Wherein consists the modern and German form of mindHow the aptitude
659
Moral character of this mysticismConception of dutyConception of God
665
His history of CromwellWhy it is only composed of texts connected by
671
Experience
681
Theory of axiomsOrdinary theoryIts refutationAxioms are only truths
685
Limits of our knowledgeIt is not certain that all events happen according to laws
692
Theory of inductionIts methods are of elimination or abstraction
698
Second periodPopularity good fortune and lifePermanent sensibility
704
His publicSociety in EnglandCountry comfortEleganceEducationHabits
712

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Page 385 - Now strike the golden lyre again, A louder yet, and yet a louder strain. Break his bands of sleep asunder, And rouse him, like a rattling peal of thunder. Hark, hark, the horrid sound Has raised up his head : As awaked from the dead, And amazed, he stares around. Revenge, revenge...
Page 546 - I STOOD in Venice, on the Bridge of Sighs ; A palace and a prison on each hand : I saw from out the wave her structures rise As from the stroke of the enchanter's wand...
Page 229 - Remains in danger of her former tooth. But let the frame of things disjoint, both the worlds suffer, Ere we will eat our meal in fear, and sleep In the affliction of these terrible dreams That shake us nightly.
Page 304 - Infernal world, and thou profoundest Hell Receive thy new possessor; one who brings A mind not to be changed by place or time. The mind is its own place, and in itself • Can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven.
Page 210 - No longer mourn for me when I am dead Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell Give warning to the world that I am fled From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell : Nay, if you read this line, remember not The hand that writ it ; for I love you so, That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, If thinking on me then should make you woe.
Page 289 - Methinks I see in my mind a noble and puissant nation rousing herself like a strong man after sleep, and shaking her invincible locks: methinks I see her as an eagle mewing her mighty youth, and kindling her undazzled eyes at the full mid-day beam ; purging and unsealing her long-abused sight at the fountain itself of heavenly radiance, while the whole noise of timorous and flocking birds, with those also that love the twilight, flutter about, amazed at what she means, and in their envious gabble...
Page 455 - I have been assured by a very knowing American of my acquaintance in London, that a young healthy child well nursed is at a year old a most delicious, nourishing, and wholesome food, whether stewed, roasted, baked, or boiled; and I make no doubt that it will equally serve in a fricassee, or a ragout.
Page 212 - Such an act, That blurs the grace and blush of modesty ; Calls virtue hypocrite ; takes off the rose From the fair forehead of an innocent love, And sets a blister there; makes marriage vows As false as dicers...
Page 295 - These abilities, wheresoever they be found, are the inspired gift of God rarely bestowed, but yet to some (though most abuse) in every nation : and are of power, beside the office of a pulpit, to inbreed and cherish in a great people the seeds of virtue and public civility; to allay the perturbations of the mind, and set the affections in right tune...
Page 251 - Wilt thou have this woman to thy wedded wife, to live together after God's ordinance in the holy estate of matrimony ? Wilt thou love her, comfort her, honour, and keep her, in sickness and in health ; and, forsaking all others, keep thee only unto her, so long as ye both shall live ? " The man shall answer,

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