Hours in a Library: Massinger. Fielding's novels. Cowper and Rousseau. The first Edinburgh reviewers. Wordsworth's ethics. Landor's imaginary conversations. Macaulay. Charlotte Brontė. Charles Kingsley

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Smith, Elder, & Company, 1879 - English essays
 

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Page 192 - That age is best, which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; But being spent, the worse, and worst Times still succeed the former. Then be not coy, but use your time, And while ye may, go marry: For having lost but once your prime, You may for ever tarry.
Page 380 - Less Philomel will deign a song In her sweetest saddest plight, Smoothing the rugged brow of Night, While Cynthia checks her dragon yoke Gently o'er the accustomed oak. Sweet bird, that shunn'st the noise of folly, Most musical, most melancholy!
Page 205 - The primal duties shine aloft — like stars ; The charities that soothe, and heal, and bless, Are scattered at the feet of Man — like flowers.
Page 180 - The poet's eye, in a fine frenzy rolling, Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven ; And, as imagination bodies forth The forms of things unknown, the poet's pen Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing A local habitation, and a name. Such tricks hath strong imagination, That, if it would but apprehend some joy, It comprehends some bringer of that joy ; Or, in the night, imagining some fear, How easy is a bush supposed a bear ! Hip.
Page 227 - I trust is their destiny, to console the afflicted, to add sunshine to daylight by making the happy happier, to teach the young and the gracious of every age, to see, to think and feel, and therefore to become more actively and securely virtuous...
Page 203 - My eyes are dim with childish tears. My heart is idly stirred, For the same sound is in my ears Which in those days I heard. Thus fares it still in our decay : And yet the wiser mind Mourns less for what age takes away Than what it leaves behind.
Page 210 - O Reader ! had you in your mind Such stores as silent thought can bring, O gentle Reader ! you would find A tale in every thing.
Page 131 - The grand transition, that there lives and works A soul in all things, and that soul is God.
Page 217 - If thou art beautiful, and youth And thought endue thee with all truth — Be strong ; — be worthy of the grace Of God, and fill thy destined place : A soul, by force of sorrows high, Uplifted to the purest sky Of undisturbed humanity...
Page 200 - We live by Admiration, Hope, and Love ; And, even as these are well and wisely fixed, In dignity of being we ascend.

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