The Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 70

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Bickers and Son, 1880 - 1002 pages
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Page 293 - For thou hast said in thine heart, I will ascend into heaven, I will exalt my throne above the stars of God: I will sit also upon the mount of the congregation, in the sides of the north: I will ascend above the heights of the clouds: I will be like the most High.
Page 273 - And nothing can we call our own but death And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones.
Page 235 - Between the acting of a dreadful thing And the first motion, all the interim is Like a phantasma, or a hideous dream : The genius, and the mortal instruments, Are then in council : and the state of man, Like to a little kingdom, suffers then The nature of an insurrection.
Page 4 - D' Achille e del suo padre esser cagione Prima di trista, e poi di buona mancia.
Page 372 - The First Part of the Contention betwixt the two famous houses of Yorke and Lancaster...
Page 395 - And I am full of tossings to and fro unto the dawning of the day. My flesh is clothed with worms and clods of dust; My skin is broken, and become loathsome. My days are swifter than a weaver's shuttle, And are spent without hope.
Page 159 - The ancients, who often paid more attention to received opinions than to the evidence of their senses, believed that fern bore no seed. Our ancestors imagined that this plant produced seed which was invisible. Hence, from an extraordinary mode of reasoning, founded on the fantastic doctrine of signatures, they concluded that they who possessed the secret of wearing this seed about them would become invisible.
Page 91 - It is a nation, would I answer Plato, that hath no kind of traffic, no knowledge of letters, no intelligence of numbers, no name of magistrate, nor of...
Page 111 - As thou hast shown it flinty by thy deeds." 148. curtal dog] The reference is to the turnspit dog with the tail cut short. " A curtal dog," says Nares, Glossary, " was originally the dog of an unqualified person, which, by the forest laws, must have its tail cut short, partly as a mark and partly from a notion that the tail of a dog is necessary to him in running.

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