Tours in Upper India, and in Parts of the Himalaya Mountains: With Accounts of the Courts of the Native Princes, &c, Volume 1

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Page iii - HIGH on a throne of royal state, which far Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind, Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand Showers on her kings barbaric pearl and gold...
Page 142 - True it is, that her government was politic and respected when her power was thought of consequence; now, when age has chilled her blood, and the march of events has left her no exercise for those talents, which would have shone with splendour on a more extended theatre, she has turned her attention to the agricultural improvement of her country, though she knows she is planting that which others will reap. Her fields look greener and more flourishing, and the population of her villages appear happier...
Page 288 - ... resemblance I can find for the machinery. All being ready, a band of instruments struck up such sounds as one might imagine would serve as revelry for the powers of darkness; and if superstition and gross idolatry are two, that which is now recorded was fit music for them. Two men took each of the frames, and resting them on their shoulders, moved to the music in measured steps: the mop of hair and petticoats danced too; the gods jumped about, and now and then most lovingly knocked their heads...
Page 144 - Bhurtpore, in 1826, the Commander-in-chief was desirous that no Native chief of our allies should accompany the besieging force with any of his troops; this order hurt the pride of the Begum, who remonstrated. She was told that the large and holy place of Muttra was to be confided to her care.
Page 141 - Begum, who had till then never appeared in male society, threw open the blinds of her palankeen, and mounted an elephant; she harangued the troops upon her attachment to them, and her opposition to the commands of her husband; she professed no other desire than to be at their head, and to share her wealth with them: the novelty of the situation lent energy to her action and eloquence to her language, and amid the acclamations of the soldiers she was led back in triumph to the camp. It is said she...
Page 140 - ... not fail, in some way, to fulfil her expectations. She gave orders to her own immediate attendants to communicate in privacy with the soldiery the part which her husband intended to pursue, and to express to them how much that purpose was at variance with her own inclinations, which were wholly inseparable from the presence and the happiness of her people. Upon this, a scheme of ambush was so prepared, that the Frenchman had no chance of escape, even admitting he had seen through the artifice...
Page 383 - ... prevented his having recourse to any thing for his work but the simple narration of matter-of-fact occurrences. At this visit to Delhi we did not see the King, but we saw the two younger Princes. The youngest but one affects the manners and habits of Europeans, and is constantly betraying his absurdity by want of reflection; for instance, when he set up an English coach, he insisted that the coachman should not sit above himself. He wears an European-cut coat, with stars on both breasts: top-boots...
Page 78 - The hawk, which was of the long-wing, soaring kind, named a bkyree, proceeded in chase. Aware of his .inability to rise so fast as his quarry, he went away, as if not disposed to come back, but imperceptibly ascending. Having gone far enough, he tacked, and continued to do so until he was above the curlew. These turns which the hawk makes, are very beautiful, and evince great sagacity. In the meantime, the curlew had got so high, as scarcely to be within ken, having also gained a considerable distance...
Page 110 - ... satisfactorily adjusted as to the mode of presentation, the Commander-in-chief stipulated that nothing derogatory to his situation or rank should be required; neither on his own part did he desire more than to be received on the same terms and with the consideration applicable to the Resident. The prospect of a handsome nuzzer or offering operated with the King to facilitate the presentation; for it is known that by such means he is necessitated to eke out the scanty pittance allowed to him and...
Page 207 - ... fifty feet wide, during their whole lives. Those who trusted to the ready recommendation, had the felicity of experiencing the fallacy of the assertions and of their own hopes..* * It is with difficulty that a camel can walk up a plane of twenty degrees without a load ; but with any weight at all We had much to do while here. All the camp equipage was required to go back to Kurnaul to be stored, and the followers paid off; and here we were to get ready to scale the mountains, by making up most...

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