The Futures of Old Age

Front Cover
John A Vincent, Chris Phillipson, Murna Downs
SAGE, May 15, 2006 - Social Science - 272 pages
What is the future of old age? How will families, services, and economies adapt to an older population? Such questions often provoke extreme and opposing answers: some see ageing populations as having the potential to undermine economic growth and prosperity; others see new and exciting ways of living in old age. The Futures of Old Age places these questions in the context of social and political change, and assesses what the various futures of old age might be.

Prepared by the British Society of Gerontology, The Futures of Old Age brings together a team of leading international gerontologists from the United Kingdom and United States, drawing on their expertise and research. The book′s seven sections deal with key contemporary themes including: population ageing; households and families; health; wealth; pensions; migration; inequalities; gender and self; and identity in later life.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Part IThe Future of the Life Course
9
Golden Cohortto Generation Z
12
Two Future Conflicts Across Generationsand Cohorts?
20
Three Developments in the Life Course
30
The Future of Social Differentiation
41
An Enduring Relationship
44
Change Choice and Constraints
54
Twelve Ageing and Belief Between Tradition and Change
125
Part V The Future for Health and Wellbeing in Old Age
135
Thirteen Will Our Old Age Be Healthier?
138
Fourteen Is there a Better Future for People with Dementia and their Families?
147
Quality of Life of Older People in the Twentyfirst Century
154
Sixteen The Ageing of Family Life Transitions
164
Widowed and Divorced Men and Women in Later Life
172
Eighteen Housing and Future Living Arrangements
180

Six Ethnicity and Old Age
62
The Future of Retirement and Pensions
73
Seven The Future of Inequalitiesin Retirement Income
76
Eight Will the Babyboomers be Better off than their Parents in Retirement?
85
Nine The Future of Stock Market Pensions
98
The Future for Self in Old Age
107
Distinctiveness and Uniformity in the Struggle for Intergenerational Solidarity
109
Eleven Biographical Work and the Futureof the Ageing Self
117
Globalization and the Future of Old Age
189
Nineteen Antiageing Science andthe Future of Old Age
192
Twenty Ageing and Globalization
201
Twentyone The Future Life Course Migration and Old Age
208
References
218
Index
246
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About the author (2006)

am currently working on ‘anti-ageing medicine', death and immortality and the insights they provide for the cultural construction of old age . These studies identify a crisis in understanding ‘old age' which stems from significant advances in the control and manipulation of biological ageing. Claims to the technical ability to control the human ageing process are far from new but challenging issues about the meaning of old age arise with the prospect of significantly enhanced longevity claimed by contemporary bio-gerontology. I have written journal articles, chapters and given seminars on the significance of the biologisation of old age many of which can be accessed from this page.

Chris Phillipson is Professor of Applied Social Studies and Social Gerontology at Keele University.

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