An Outline of Philosophy

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 1995 - Philosophy - 247 pages
Philosophy, Russell argues, is concerned with the universe as a whole. He reveals how the world in which we seem to live differs from reality and makes clear how scientific advance has transformed our concept of the world.
 

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Contents

Philosophic Doubts
1
MAN FROM WITHOUT 2 Man and his Environment
13
The Process of Learning in Animals and Infants
23
Language
34
Perception Objectively Regarded
46
Memory Objectively Regarded
56
Inference as a Habit
63
Knowledge Behaviouristically considered
70
MAN FROM WITHIN 16 Selfobservation
129
Images
141
Imagination and Memory
150
The Introspective Analysis of Perception
161
Consciousness?
168
Emotion Desire and Will
174
Ethics
180
THE UNIVERSE 23 Some Great Philosophies of the Past
189

THE PHYSICAL WORLD 9 The Structure of the Atom
77
Relativity
85
Causal Laws in Physics
90
Physics and Perception
97
Physical and Perceptual Space
108
Perception and Physical Causal Laws
114
The Nature of our Knowledge of Physics
120
Truth and Falsehood
204
The Validity of Inference
214
Events Matter and Mind
222
Mans Place in the Universe
235
Index
243
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Bertrand Arthur William Russell (1872-1970) was a British philosopher, logician, essayist and social critic. He was best known for his work in mathematical logic and analytic philosophy. Together with G.E. Moore, Russell is generally recognized as one of the main founders of modern analytic philosophy. Together with Kurt Gödel, he is regularly credited with being one of the most important logicians of the twentieth century. Over the course of a long career, Russell also made contributions to a broad range of subjects, including the history of ideas, ethics, political and educational theory, and religious studies. General readers have benefited from his many popular writings on a wide variety of topics. After a life marked by controversy--including dismissals from both Trinity College, Cambridge, and City College, New York--Russell was awarded the Order of Merit in 1949 and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1950. Noted also for his many spirited anti-nuclear protests and for his campaign against western involvement in the Vietnam War, Russell remained a prominent public figure until his death at the age of 97.

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