A Classical Manual: Being a Mythological, Historical, and Geographical Commentary on Pope's Homer and Dryden's Aeneid of Virgil

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J. Murray, 1833 - Classical dictionaries - 697 pages
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Page 418 - Before the gates there sat On either side a formidable shape ; The one seem'd woman to the waist, and fair, But ended foul in many a scaly fold, Voluminous and vast, a serpent arm'd With mortal sting : about her middle round A cry of hell hounds never ceasing bark'd With wide Cerberean mouths full loud, and rung A hideous peal : yet, when they list, would creep, If aught disturbed their noise, into her womb, And kennel there ; yet there still bark'd and howl'd Within unseen.
Page 433 - With burnish'd neck of verdant gold, erect Amidst his circling spires, that on the grass Floated redundant...
Page 439 - Whose waves of torrent fire inflame with rage. Far off from these a slow and silent stream, Lethe, the river of oblivion, rolls Her wat'ry labyrinth, whereof who drinks Forthwith his former state and being forgets, Forgets both joy and grief, pleasure and pain.
Page 500 - Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star...
Page 426 - Thus was this place, A happy rural seat of various view! Groves whose rich trees wept odorous gums and balm; Others whose fruit, burnished with golden rind, Hung amiable — Hesperian fables true, If true, here only — and of delicious taste.
Page 287 - Not that Nepenthes which the wife of Thone In Egypt gave to Jove-born Helena Is of such power to stir up joy as this, To life so friendly, or so cool to thirst.
Page 490 - We find, however, that he has interwoven, in the course of his fable, the principal particulars, which were generally believed among the Romans, of jEneas's voyage and settlement in Italy.
Page 420 - And fuelled entrails thence conceiving fire, Sublimed* with mineral fury, aid the winds, And leave a singed bottom all involved With stench and smoke: such resting found the sole Of unblest feet.
Page 308 - Circe's island fell: (Who knows not Circe The daughter of the sun? whose charmed cup "Whoever tasted, lost his upright shape, And downward fell into a groveling swine) This Nymph that gaz'd upon his clust'ring locks,.
Page 449 - It was the part of the Patron to advise and to defend his client, to assist him with his interest and •substance, in short to do every thing for him that a parent uses to do for his children. The Client was obliged to pay all kind of respect to his patron, and to serve him with his life and fortune in any extremity, Dionys.

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