Parliamentary Papers, Volume 4

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H.M. Stationery Office, 1826 - Great Britain
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Page 196 - ... pretext of any Charters, or Letters Patent, by any of our Progenitors or Ancestors, late Kings or Queens of England...
Page 342 - From the evidence, and other information collected by your Committee, it appears that, in some districts of the country, able-bodied labourers are sent round to the farmers, and receive a part, and in some instances the whole of their subsistence from the parish, while working upon the land of individuals. This practice was, doubtless, introduced at first as a means of employing the surplus labourers of a parish ; but by an abuse, which is almost inevitable, it has been converted into a means of...
Page 294 - Please Your Excellency, we labor under a heavy grievance, which we confidently hope Your Excellency will redress, and then we will be completely happy, viz: — the want of clergymen to administer to us the comforts of our Holy Religion, and good school-masters to instruct our children.
Page 344 - ... labourers, affords the means of remedying, in some degree, the existing evil of adding to the wages of labour from the poor-rate. Wherever, from disinclination to work, parents earn less than they might do, in order to draw from the parish fund, it might be found highly useful, that the parish officers, with the consent of the magistrates, should, instead of giving money to the parents, set to work their children, who would, at the same time, be removed from the example of idle or dissolute parents....
Page 342 - Committee, it appears, that in some districts of the country, able-bodied labourers are sent round to the farmers, and receive a part, and in some instances the whole, of their subsistence from the parish, while working upon the land of individuals. This practice was, doubtless, introduced at first as a means of employing the surplus labourers of a parish ; but by an abuse which is almost inevitable, it has been converted into a means of obliging the parish to pay for labour which ought to have been...
Page 309 - The rent is such as the middle-man chooses to impose, the tenant being willing to promise anything rather than go into a town, where he knows he cannot find employment ; and hoping to get subsistence for a year or two on his new holding. But at the end of a year, all that he has is seized for his new master, and he is ultimately compelled to seek an asylum in some hovel or town, trusting for his support to the precarious chance of daily labour.
Page 343 - ... character is taken away. The effects have corresponded with the cause. Able-bodied men are found slovenly at their work, and dissolute in their hours of relaxation ; a father is negligent of his children ; the children do not think it necessary to contribute to the support of their parents; the employers and the employed are engaged in perpetual quarrels, and the pauper, always relieved, is always discontented; crime advances with increasing boldness, and the parts of the country where this system...
Page 344 - ... orders of Magistrates, who, with excellent intentions, are often not conversant with the details of the management of the parish in whose concerns they interfere. The great object to be aimed at, is, if possible, to separate the maintenance of the unemployed from the wages of the employed labourer ; to divide two classes which have been confounded ; to leave the employed labourer in possession of wages sufficient to maintain his family, and to oblige the rest to work for the parish in the way...
Page 39 - ... evidence. As the army and navy resort to Halifax, we have generally a very large portion of orphan children thrown upon the poor list ; and our mode of disposing of these children is, that at four to five years of age we put them out apprentices to farmers, unless they choose a trade ; if they choose a trade, of course they are bound to a trade. The stipulation that is made for those children with the person to whom each child is bound is, that the first year he is to give that child a sheep...
Page 5 - ... articles of his native country. Nor, on the other hand, can any calculable period be assigned for the termination of such a system, until all the colonies of the British empire are saturated, and millions added to those who speak the English language, and carry with them the liberty and the laws and the sympathies of their native country.

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