Songs of the Saints from the Adi Granth

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SUNY Press, Oct 19, 2000 - Religion - 308 pages
This complete and accessible translation of the songs of the saints from the Sikh holy book, the Adi Granth, provides access to the hymns written by Hindu and Muslim devotional writers of north India, who flourished from the twelfth to the eighteenth centuries.

The songs of the saints hold a unique position in Sikhism in that they provide the faith with a prehistory that reaches back to the dawn of north Indian Bhakti and Sant traditions. These works provided a ground upon which Sikh gurus laid the foundations of their faith.

The songs also mark the earliest beginnings of Hindi literature. Although the literary output of these saints comes down to us in various stages of corruption, the works which appeared in the Adi Granth are unchanged since their inclusion in that work in the early 1600s.
 

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Contents

Namdeva
25
Ravi Dass
83
Jayadeva
129
Trilochan
137
Beni
147
Ramananda
159
Sain
165
Dhanna
169
Sur Dass
185
Sheikh Bhikhan
191
Parmananda
197
Sheikh Farid
201
The Slokas of Sheikh Farid
211
Notes to the Songs of the Saints from the Adi Granth
241
Glossary
287
Index

Sadha
177
Pipa
181

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Page 7 - The engendering of the perpetual signifier within the field of the text should not be identified with an organic process of maturation or a hermeneutic process of deepening, but rather with a serial movement of dislocations, overlappings, and variations.
Page 7 - Texts don't have meanings, except in their relations to other texts, so that there is something uneasily dialectical about literary meaning. A single text has only part of a meaning; it is itself a synecdoche for a larger whole including other texts. A text is a relational event, and not a substance to be analyzed.
Page 17 - Gurinder Singh Mann, The Goindval Pothis: The Earliest Extant Source of the Sikh Canon (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1996), pp.
Page 7 - Lord, if You will not break with me, then I will not break with You. For, if I were to break with You, with whom would I then join? | | / | | Pause | | If You are the lamp, then I am the wick. If You are the sacred place of pilgrimage, then I am the pilgrim.
Page 17 - Harold Bloom, Kabbalah and Criticism (New York: Seabury Press, 1975), p. 106. 18. Roland Barthes, "From Work to Text," in Textual Strategies: Perspectives in Post-Structuralist Criticism, ed.
Page 12 - a simple unity, without any mode, without time or space, without before or after, without desire or possession, without light or darkness. He is a perpetual now, the bottomless abyss, the darkness of silence, the desert wilderness," etc.1 In reality, the negative path, by setting God above all conceivable limitations, ends in the dissolution of Deity.

About the author (2000)

Nirmal Dass is an independent scholar and researcher. He is the author of The Avowing of King Arthur: A Modern Verse Translation, Rebuilding Babel: The Translations of W. H. Auden, and Songs of the Kabir from the Adi Granth, also published by SUNY Press.

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