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ADDRESS

AT THE

CONSECRATION OF A CHURCHYARD.

ADDRESS.

DEARLY BELOVED IN THE LORD, The solemn occasion on which we are assembled, suggests to us many and serious thoughts, which, if frequently recalled to the recollection of our minds, would conduce much to our moral and spiritual improvement ; to the amendment of our lives, and the salvation of our souls.

According to a very ancient and very wise custom, we are met for the awful purpose of setting apart a peculiar place in which to bury the bodies of human beings; to bury the bodies of persons who have shared with ourselves the several endearments of social intercourse ; to bury the bodies of Christians who have lived in the faith, and died in the hope, imparted to them by the Lord who redeemed them.

When we consider “ how fearfully and wonderfully” we are made ; when we consider that, in the frame of our bodies and faculties of our souls, we are infinitely superior to the brute creation ; we immediately perceive it is degrading to our nature, and almost an insult to the Divine Author of our nature, that the deceased corpse of man should be removed from society with as much indifference as the dead carcass of a tame or a savage beast. From this persuasion, and a sense of respect for those who had been known, been honoured, been loved by them, the heathens, in nations where the

ADDRESS.

DEARLY BELOVED IN THE Lord, The solemn occasion on which we are assembled, suggests to us many and serious thoughts, which, if frequently recalled to the recollection of our minds, would conduce much to our moral and spiritual improvement ; to the amendment of our lives, and the salvation of our souls.

According to a very ancient and very wise custom, we are met for the awful purpose of setting apart a peculiar place in which to bury the bodies of human beings; to bury the bodies of persons who have shared with ourselves the several endearments of social intercourse ; to bury the bodies of Christians who have lived in the faith, and died in the hope, imparted to them by the Lord who redeemed them.

When we consider “how fearfully and wonderfully" we are made ; when we consider that, in the frame of our bodies and faculties of our souls, we are infinitely superior to the brute creation ; we immediately perceive it is degrading to our nature, and almost an insult to the Divine Author of our nature, that the deceased corpse of man should be removed from society with as much indifference as the dead carcass of a tame or a savage beast. From this persuasion, and a sense of respect for those who had been known, been honoured, , been loved by them, the heathens, in nations where the

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