The Doctor's Dilemma

Front Cover
Penguin Adult, 1946 - Drama - 187 pages
26 Reviews

David Dyer's astonishing novel The Midnight Watchis based on the true story of the SS Californian, the ship that sawtheTitanic'sdistress rockets and yet, unfathomably, did nothing. A psychological thriller.


Sometimes the smallest of human failings can lead to the greatest of disasters

On a wretchedly cold night in the North Atlantic, a steamer stopped in an icefield sees the glow of another ship on the horizon. Just after midnight the first of eight distress rockets is fired. Why did theCalifornian look on while theTitanicsank?

As soon as Boston Americanreporter John Steadman lays eyes on the man who stood the midnight watch on the Californian, he knows there's another story lurking behind the official one. Herbert Stone must have seen something, and yet his ship did nothing while the calamity took place. Now Stone, under his captain's orders, must carry his secret in silence, while Steadman is determined to find it out.

So begins a strange dance around the truth by these three men. Haunted by the fifteen hundred who went to their deaths in those icy waters, and by the loss of his own baby son years earlier, Steadman must either find redemption in the Titanic's tragedy or lose himself.

Based on true events, The Midnight Watchis at once a heart-stopping mystery and a deeply knowing novel - about the frailty of men, the strength of women, the capriciousness of fate and the price of loyalty.

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    Review: The Doctor's Dilemma: A Tragedy

    User Review  - Goodreads

    Shaw shows how spectacular and even accused trials of doctors to prevent an illness. With a bitter mockery, explains the futile essays of injecting ppl with TB strains, in order that they'd be ... Read full review

    Review: The Doctor's Dilemma: A Tragedy

    User Review  - Gamaleldin Soliman - Goodreads

    Shaw shows how spectacular and even accused trials of doctors to prevent an illness. With a bitter mockery, explains the futile essays of injecting ppl with TB strains, in order that they'd be ... Read full review

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    About the author (1946)

    George Bernard Shawwas born in Dublin in 1856. Although essentially shy, he created the persona of G. B. S., the showman, satirist, controversialist, critic, pundit, wit, intellectual buffoon and dramatist. Commentators brought a new adjective into English: Shavian, a term used to embody all his brilliant qualities.

    After his arrival in London in 1876 he became an active Socialist and a brilliant platform speaker. He wrote on many social aspects of the day: on Common Sense about the War (1914), How to Settle the Irish Question (1917) and The Intelligent Woman's Guide to Socialism and Capitalism (1928). He undertook his own education at the British Museum and consequently became keenly interested in cultural subjects. Thus his prolific output included music, art and theatre reviews, which were collected into several volumes such as Music in London 1890 - 1894 (3 vols, 1931); Pen Portraits and Reviews (1931); and Our Theatres in the Nineties (3 vols, 1931). He also wrote five novels and some shorter fiction, including The Black Girl in Search of God and Some Lesser Tales and Cashel Byron's Profession, both published in Penguin's Bernard Shaw Library.

    He conducted a strong attack on the London theatre and was closely associated with the intellectual revival of British theatre. His plays fall into several categories: 'Plays Pleasant'; 'Plays Unpleasant'

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